cot death


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cot death

the unexplained sudden death of an infant during sleep
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Cot death is the leading cause of death among babies between a month and a year old.
"Not only that, parents may blame themselves for the sudden death of a baby and ask 'did I do something wrong?' ' "There can also be a stigma attached to cot death and parents can carry all this guilt, and often the way people react can also affect them especially if they are being told 'you can always have another baby.'"If you are struggling with the loss of a child you can call Liverpool Bereavement Services on 0151 236 3932 or email enquiries@liverpoolbereavement.co.uk What causes cot death/SIDS?
The Lullaby Trust and Bounty Parenting Club has released research showing that the greatest of these worries are cot death (also known as sudden infant death syndrome or SIDS), meningitis and stillbirth.
A spokeswoman said certain behaviours have been shown to increase a baby's risk of cot death, including allowing a baby to get too hot, if the mother smokes during pregnancy or after the baby is born, and sharing a bed with the baby - particularly with parents who have been drinking or taking drugs Placing a baby on its back to sleep reduces the risk of cot death, she added.
Scientists found the risk of cot death among breastfed babies under three months increased with bed sharing, even when parents did not smoke and the mother had not consumed alcohol or drugs.
And William - who appeared in the Sunday Mail in 1986 when he was helped by the newly formed Scottish Cot Death Trust - is highlighting the charity's new Next Infant Support Programme.
"I'm not against a cot death plot if it's done sensitively because it's good to keep it in the public eye.
Gemma said she was given a leaflet about cot death which she read but admits the message got lost amongst all the other information given to new mums.
MORE than half of cot deaths happen when a baby is sleeping with a parent, a study has revealed.
Despite a dramatic drop in the rate of cot death in the UK since the early 1990s, experts are advising parents to avoid dangerous co-sleeping arrangements in order to help reduce these deaths even further.