Cotillion


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Cotillion

 

a ballroom dance of French origin, similar to the contredanse. Known since the 18th century, the cotillion became particularly popular in mid-19th-century Europe, including Russia. It combined several dances (waltz, mazurka, and polka) and was performed by all participants at the end of the ball. The variety of the dance depended on the leading couple: the male dancer signaled the orchestra, called out the figures, and coordinated the movements of the other dancers.

REFERENCE

Ivanovskii, N. P. Bal’nyi tanets XVI-XIX vv. Leningrad-Moscow, 1948.
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Applications or nominations for cotillion director are currently being received.
Looking at the likely prices, with one exception - Majestic Bay back in 2000 who scored at 25-1 - no other winner went off at bigger than 11-1 so that takes care of Cotillion, leaving us with WOODFALL TREASURE.
Open to suggestion and very playful, he created the musical interludes at national meetings (the Braid-Portz Cotillion in Atlanta, 1978, celebrated the Braid Presidency but spawned an on-going series of musical interactions that have been with NCHC ever since); he instigated the Idea Exchange (called Idea Market originally); he and Edythe sponsored the Portz Grant and gave the first Portz Scholarships to prime the regional pumps for successful applicants to Honors Semesters; he advocated and fought for NCHC's sponsorship of the NCUR and publications that feature undergraduate student writing.
Thus, the cotillion occupies a transitory place in the history of English social dance because it was adapted from the seventeenth-and eighteenth-century longways dances and introduced the square formations that would characterize much of nineteenth-century social dance.
One of the virtues of this book is that it pays careful attention to a number of authors and works that have been forgotten or generally disregarded by critics, such as John Oliver Killens's The Cotillion, Charles Wright's The Wig, William Melvin Kelley's dem and A Different Drummer, and Hal Bennett's Lord of Dark Places, as well as recent works that have yet to receive a careful assessment--for instance, Paul Beatty's The White Boy Shuffle and Darius James's Negrophobia.
Ophelia's Cotillion opens with a black crow sweeping across the stage and then nestling into the trees, observing and shadowing everything that follows.
Because of that friendship, our family was invited to the cotillion of Pierre's sister, Kate.
Since its inception in 1971, the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum held in Davos has become the global economy's Cotillion Ball - a chance for the economic elites to take on the weighty issues facing the world during a week-long series of informal discussions and private dinners and meetings where the real action takes place.
New introductions include Cotillion, a large-scale master bedroom floral and Collins, a master bedroom paisley.
His other works include `Sippi (1967); Slaves (1969); The Cotillion (1971); The Great Black Russian: A Novel on the Life and Times of Alexander Pushkin (1988); and two books for juveniles: Great Gittin' Up Morning (1972), a biography of Denmark Vesey, and A Man Ain't Nothin' but a Man: The Adventures of John Henry (1975).
Pletcher set the season purse record on a remarkable day in October 2006 when Fleet Indian captured a win in the prestigious Beldame Stakes at Belmont Park, Honey Ryder won the Flower Bowl Invitational, English Channel won the Joe Hirsch Turf Classic Invitational Stakes, and India won the Fitz Dixon Cotillion Breeders' Cup Handicap at Philadelphia Park.
Her cotillion, wearing Italian-inspired fashion and alluring masks, trailed behind her as she invited guests to indulge in the new Swiss Miss Chocolate Hazelnut.