Cotillion


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Cotillion

 

a ballroom dance of French origin, similar to the contredanse. Known since the 18th century, the cotillion became particularly popular in mid-19th-century Europe, including Russia. It combined several dances (waltz, mazurka, and polka) and was performed by all participants at the end of the ball. The variety of the dance depended on the leading couple: the male dancer signaled the orchestra, called out the figures, and coordinated the movements of the other dancers.

REFERENCE

Ivanovskii, N. P. Bal’nyi tanets XVI-XIX vv. Leningrad-Moscow, 1948.
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The cotillion includes monthly classes plus a Holly Ball and Spring Ball, and instructional three, five, and seven course dinners.
The feature race on the card, the Pulteney Land Investment Ltd Handicap Hurdle, saw Cotillion strike for in-form trainer Ian Williams.
She and her five-piece band Cotillion will be performing by the lake and audiences can also bring a picnic and enjoy the gardens before the performance.
A couple of talented Falbrav fillies in Dance Fantasia and Forever Mark could prove to be threatening with their two-kilogram handicap, and Makoto Kaneko, the owner of Triple Crown winners Deep Impact and Apapane, aims to capture yet another Grade 1 medal with Cotillion who was the early second choice.
That gets rid of another five, leaving us with just Lady Eclair, Woolfall Treasure, Cotillion and Dazzling Light.
She is a member of the Southern Debutante Cotillion and was presented in Montgomery, Alabama, at the Camellia Debutante Ball.
Louis society at the Veiled Prophet Ball, the largest cotillion in the country.
danced the cotillion too, held a benefit dance and supper
Footage of the Rex Ball introduces a flavor of social history: After a soft voice-over that speaks of the "magnificently mounted masquerades of metaphor," an elegant blond walks the cotillion floor on her escort's arm.
Open to suggestion and very playful, he created the musical interludes at national meetings (the Braid-Portz Cotillion in Atlanta, 1978, celebrated the Braid Presidency but spawned an on-going series of musical interactions that have been with NCHC ever since); he instigated the Idea Exchange (called Idea Market originally); he and Edythe sponsored the Portz Grant and gave the first Portz Scholarships to prime the regional pumps for successful applicants to Honors Semesters; he advocated and fought for NCHC's sponsorship of the NCUR and publications that feature undergraduate student writing.
Thus, the cotillion occupies a transitory place in the history of English social dance because it was adapted from the seventeenth-and eighteenth-century longways dances and introduced the square formations that would characterize much of nineteenth-century social dance.
One of the virtues of this book is that it pays careful attention to a number of authors and works that have been forgotten or generally disregarded by critics, such as John Oliver Killens's The Cotillion, Charles Wright's The Wig, William Melvin Kelley's dem and A Different Drummer, and Hal Bennett's Lord of Dark Places, as well as recent works that have yet to receive a careful assessment--for instance, Paul Beatty's The White Boy Shuffle and Darius James's Negrophobia.