Cotillion

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cotillion

 

a ballroom dance of French origin, similar to the contredanse. Known since the 18th century, the cotillion became particularly popular in mid-19th-century Europe, including Russia. It combined several dances (waltz, mazurka, and polka) and was performed by all participants at the end of the ball. The variety of the dance depended on the leading couple: the male dancer signaled the orchestra, called out the figures, and coordinated the movements of the other dancers.

REFERENCE

Ivanovskii, N. P. Bal’nyi tanets XVI-XIX vv. Leningrad-Moscow, 1948.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Ophelia's Cotillion: An Invitation to the Nightmare Years, a new musical offering from collaborators Elmo Terry-Morgan and Clarice LaVerne Thompson, attempts to mend this oversight.
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(4) The "Contredanse Francaise," known as the "cotillion" (or "cotillon") in England, used the same steps as longways dances (Contredanse Anglaise), changing only the form (the arrangement of the dancers).
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The cotillion formation established by these individuals and their romances also corresponds to the novel's use of place.
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Because of that friendship, our family was invited to the cotillion of Pierre's sister, Kate.