countable

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Related to countably: Countably additive, Countably compact

countable

[′kau̇nt·ə·bəl]
(mathematics)
Either finite or denumerable. Also known as enumerable.

countable

(mathematics)
A term describing a set which is isomorphic to a subet of the natural numbers. A countable set has "countably many" elements. If the isomorphism is stated explicitly then the set is called "a counted set" or "an enumeration".

Examples of countable sets are any finite set, the natural numbers, integers, and rational numbers. The real numbers and complex numbers are not
References in periodicals archive ?
Then for every bounded set [OMEGA] [subset] X, F is a countably strict set-contraction operator on [bar.
Next suppose A is any I-sequentially countably compact subset of X.
40, a set X being infinite, it can be expressed as a disjoint union of a class C of countably infinite sets that is, each of which has cardinality [omega].
k] has a countable basis, open balls with rational center and rational radius, there exist countably many such V that cover B.
n] is a countably additive, regular complex measure with compact support contained in K(see the proof of Singer's theorem in (2)).
As long as it is produced recursively--like any other human language-it will only have countably many expressions (words, sentences, texts).
This second, larger infinite number is so much larger than our first countably infinite infinity of whole numbers, [yen], that it is an uncountably infinite number
The classical mathematician is likely to assume the existence of only countably many finitist functions or function signs.
1994; Bemardo and Judd 1996) there is no adverse selection problem because demand orders do not affect the price at which orders execute (because there exists a countably infinite number of traders).
In the sequel, let Var denote a countably infinite set of variables, denoted x, y, z .
Given a finite or countably infinite set P of C-products, its saturation [bar]P is defined as [bar]P = {p / [exists]p' [element of] P.
On his reading, Landini will have to explain how Russell and Whitehead can hold both that there are more propositional functions than individuals (see their 1912, vii) while also holding that propositional functions are open sentences, of which there are only countably many.