transference

(redirected from counter transference)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

transference

[tranz′fər·əns]
(psychology)
The unconscious transfer of the patient's feelings and reactions originally associated with important persons in the patient's life, usually father, mother, or siblings, toward others and in the analytic situation, toward the analyst.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many writers who place great emphasis on parallel process and psychoanalytically derived ideas of transference and counter transference pass very quickly over the fact, pointed out by Du Plock (2009), that as supervisor I have no direct access either to the client's narrative of the experience of being or to the supervisee's experience of being in relation to the client.
This reflective practice is to provide a longitudinal perspective of the trajectory of the drama (main conflicts, crisis points, what "act" are you in?), the history of the relationship (ups and downs, turning points, transferences, counter transferences), and the history of finding common ground (changing problems, roles and goals, who else is involved in the drama?) (Stewart et al., 2003).
In psychoanalysis, counter transference referred to the unconscious projections by the therapist onto the patient, of unresolved past developmental conflicts.
That is, what he thought was the real thing--his having given false testimony in a court of law--turns out to have been a staged thing from which he, like all dramatic audiences, now may learn to do "the right thing." In the Preface to her work, Cooper-White writes, "The purpose of this book is to show that by delving into our own subjective experience of the counseling relationship, our 'counter transference,' we will come to a deeper, more empathic appreciation of the other ..." (p.