countertransference


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countertransference

[¦kau̇nt·ər·tranz′fər·əns]
(psychology)
The conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient, which may interfere with psychotherapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other sensitive treatments of bridge analyses are provided by Traesdal (2005), who focused on the dual loss of the analyst and the analysis, and Bachner (2014), who commented on her countertransference as the second analyst as she contended with the consequences of poorly managed termination by the dying analyst as well as the client's fear of abandonment in future analyses.
Cataloguing and processing these messages may also be useful for clinicians to address potential cultural countertransference issues that may manifest themselves in treatment with clients of African descent.
Taking the reflection about the concepts of empathy, transference and countertransference further, it is possible to meditate on some facts: as Freud could be seen, in the beginning of his practice, as someone who would put himself as authority in relationship to his patients, a lot of caregivers seem to feel like that regarding the patients they take care of, forgetting the possibility of getting in touch with the subject of his affections, as indicated by Ferenczi.
3.1 The interviewer's containing function and the transference and countertransference in the room
Psychodynamic approaches consider managing countertransference to be a therapeutic intervention, even when psychotherapy is not explicitly being carried out.
An illuminating and enlightening overview of how transference and countertransference oscillated between sadism and masochism and, therefore, helplessness and revenge had been presented.
Countertransference may be present for the counselor, and counselor and client are each at risk of retraumatizing the other (Baum, 2010; Tosone et al., 2003).
Rather than identify countertransference as our stuff" resulting from unanalyzed conflicts, the doctor's unconscious experience is inevitably and importantly crucial in "reading" the patient's communication more deeply and accurately.
(54) Countertransference has been identified as 'the term used to describe feelings evoked in the therapist by the client'.
Freud conceptualized "countertransference" as arising from the client's influence on the psychoanalyst's unconscious feelings, a manifestation of the psychoanalyst's unresolved issues, and thereby a potential impediment to treatment (Storr, 1989).
Three categories were the ability to listen with a spiritual ear, countertransference work, and the importance or value of spirituality to the counseling process.
The therapist's response within this energy field, commonly known as countertransference, will therefore be significant in therapy (p.63).