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count

1
1. the act of counting or reckoning
2. the number reached by counting; sum
3. Law a paragraph in an indictment containing a distinct and separate charge
4. Physics the total number of photons or ionized particles detected by a counter
5. Boxing Wrestling the act of telling off a number of seconds by the referee, as when a boxer has been knocked down or a wrestler pinned by his opponent
6. out for the count Boxing knocked out and unable to continue after a count of ten by the referee
7. take the count Boxing to be unable to continue after a count of ten

count

2
1. a nobleman in any of various European countries having a rank corresponding to that of a British earl
2. any of various officials in the late Roman Empire and under various Germanic kings in the early Middle Ages
3. a man who has received an honour (papal knighthood) from the Pope in recognition of good deeds, achievements, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Count

 

(Russian, graf; from German Graf), in Western Europe during the early Middle Ages, a royal servitor. Beginning in the second half of the sixth century, a count in the Frankish state possessed his own district—the county—with judicial, administrative, and military authority. Gradually the post of count became hereditary. In the period of feudal disintegration, the count was a feudal sovereign; then, at the end of this period, he became a high aristocrat. The title of count is maintained to this day in most European countries with a monarchical form of government.

In Russia the title of graf was introduced in the 18th century by Peter I and was abolished in 1917.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

count

[kau̇nt]
(aerospace engineering)
To proceed from one point to another in a countdown or plus count, normally by calling a number to signify the point reached.
To proceed in a countdown, for example, T minus 90 and counting.
(chemistry)
An ionizing event.
(design engineering)
The number of openings per linear inch in a wire cloth.
(mathematics)
To name a set of consecutive positive integers in order of size, usually starting with 1.
To associate consecutive positive integers, starting with 1, with the members of a finite set in order to determine the cardinal number of the set.
(nucleonics)
A single response of the counting system in a radiation counter.
The total number of events indicated by a counter.
(textiles)
The number of warp and filling threads per square inch of fabric.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

count

In wire cloth, the number of openings per linear inch.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"What do I think?" said Albert, evidently surprised at such a question from his companion; "I think he is a delightful fellow, who does the honors of his table admirably; who has travelled much, read much, is, like Brutus, of the Stoic school, and moreover," added he, sending a volume of smoke up towards the ceiling, "that he has excellent cigars." Such was Albert's opinion of the count, and as Franz well knew that Albert professed never to form an opinion except upon long reflection, he made no attempt to change it.
"Ah," replied he, sighing, "that is not very surprising; I have been more than a year absent from Paris, and my clothes are of a most antiquated cut; the count takes me for a provincial.
"Which are your windows?" asked he of the count, with as much indifference as he could assume.
Franz, Albert, and the count continued to descend the Corso.
Franz heard the words of the count but imperfectly, and he perhaps did not fully appreciate this new attention to their wishes; for he was wholly absorbed by the spectacle that the Piazza del Popolo presented, and by the terrible instrument that was in the centre.
"I thought," said Franz to the count, "that you told me there would be but one execution."
The Count's glib cynicism had revealed a new aspect of his nature from which we both recoiled.
Before we had taken three steps, the Count's quick eye discovered the lost mouse under the seat that we had been occupying.
"Do you see nothing there?" said the Count, catching him nervously by the collar with one hand, and pointing with the other to the place near which he had found the mouse.
"Not dirt," whispered the Count, fastening the other hand suddenly on Sir Percival's collar, and shaking it in his agitation.
Sir Percival had hitherto remained at the inner end of the boat- house with Count Fosco, while I spoke to him from the door.
Just as I moved the Count's persuasive hand was laid on his shoulder, and the Count's mellifluous voice interposed to quiet him.