coup

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Related to coup de sabre: morphea

coup

(ko͞o) [Fr.,=blow], among Native North Americans of the Plains culture, a war honor, awarded for striking an enemy in such a way that it was considered an extreme act of bravery. Generally, coups were awarded according to the degree of difficulty and danger involved; the most extreme, such as striking an armed enemy with the bare hand, counted highest. Killing an enemy, wounding him, scalping him, or stealing his horse or gun—all these were coups of value. Recital of the deeds was an important social function, and a warrior with many coups held a high status and was honored at feasts, ceremonials, and in the tribe. After warfare had ceased, coups became transferable property, passing from the old men to the younger, who needed coups to acquire warrior status in the tribe.
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coup (d'état)

the sudden overthrow of state power by unconstitutional, usually violent, means. In contrast to a revolutionary change in power, in a coup there may be no intention to change the social and economic set-up radically. Instead, a change in the governing group may be all that is intended. In recent decades, many coups have been military (see MILITARY INTERVENTION IN POLITICS). See also REVOLUTION.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Scleroderma 'en coup de sabre' and progressive facial hemiatrophy.
Keywords: En coup de sabre, frontoparietal scalp, morphea, sclerotic lesions.
A tale of two diseases: Parry romberg syndrome and en coup de sabre: A case report.
Lichen sclerosus et atrophicans, scleroderma en coup de sabre and Lyme borreliosis.
Parry-Romberg syndrome has been proposed to be an overlapping condition with linear scleroderma, "en coup de sabre." In the case reported here, the finding of unilateral cerebral microhemorrhages ipsilateral to facial hemiatrophy suggests that some cases of Parry-Romberg syndrome may be secondary to a small-vessel neurovasculopathy.
(7) The matter is further complicated by editorial issues: the critical editions of Couton (Pleiade) and Conesa (toutmoliere.net) follow the 1671 and 1682 editions, which provide slightly different stage directions than those that I have cited: first, "Les Turcs [...] feignent de donner plusieurs coup de sabre" and then, "Le Mufti commande aux Turcs de batonner le Bourgeois [...]" (Couton 771).