course

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Related to courses of action: couldn't, by way of, at least, take it for granted

course

1. the path or channel along which something moves
2. 
a. a prescribed number of lessons, lectures, etc., in an educational curriculum
b. the material covered in such a curriculum
3. a prescribed regimen to be followed for a specific period of time
4. Nautical any of the sails on the lowest yards of a square-rigged ship
5. (in medieval Europe) a charge by knights in a tournament
6. 
a. a hunt by hounds relying on sight rather than scent
b. a match in which two greyhounds compete in chasing a hare
7. the part or function assigned to an individual bell in a set of changes
8. Archaic a running race

course

1. A horizontal row containing brick headers in a masonry structure. See also: Bond
2. A layer of masonry units running horizontally in a wall or over an arch that is bonded with mortar. The horizontal joints run the entire length; the vertical joints are broken so that no two form a continuous line.

Course

 

(1) The path followed by sea and air transport, such as a ship’s course.

(2) The direction of political, social, and other activity, such as a course of development of heavy industry.

(3) In Russian, a word (kurs) designating the value of a monetary unit of one country expressed in monetary units of another country (course or parity of exchange); in capitalist countries, the price at which stocks, bonds, notes, and other securities are bought and sold (kursovaia tsena).

(4) A year of study in higher or specialized secondary educational institutions (technicums); first course, second course, and so on.

(5) The exposition of a particular academic discipline or branch of knowledge within defined limits.

(6) A completed series of actions or procedures (a course of treatment).


Course

 

(ship), the angle between the plane of the meridian and the center line of a vessel, reckoned in degrees from the northern part of the meridian clockwise (from 0° to 360°).

In the age of sailing, a course was read off in quarters of the horizon by degrees from the north and south in both directions up to 90° (for example: northeast 45°, southwest 60°) or was expressed in compass points. It is determined on a vessel by means of a gyrocompass or a magnetic compass. Because of the inherent errors in these instruments and the effect of the earth’s magnetic field on a magnetic compass, the direction of a compass meridian may differ from the geographic meridian, and there will be a corresponding difference between the compass course to which a vessel is holding and the true course as laid out on a chart. A compass course is obtained by taking the algebraic difference between the true course and the total correction computed from the elements in its composition, or by comparing the compass and true bearings of some objects (shore-based points or heavenly bodies). A vessel can be stabilized on a given course either manually or automatically; automatic stabilization relies on an automatic control system (autopilots). Navigation of sailing vessels uses the regular course terminology and also one based on the angle of the wind direction relative to the center line of the vessel. Such a course has various names depending on the value of this angle: close-hauled, beam reach, broad reach, and running.

B. P. KHABUR and A. A. IAKUSHENKOV

course

[kȯrs]
(civil engineering)
A row of stone, block, or brick of uniform height.
(navigation)
The intended direction of travel expressed as an angle in the horizontal plane between a reference line (true magnetic north) and the course line (the line connecting the point of origin and the point of destination), usually measured clockwise from the reference line. Also known as desired track.
(textiles)
A row of stitches across a knitted fabric; corresponds to the filling in woven fabric.

course

course, 1
1. A layer of masonry units running horizontally in a wall or, much less commonly, curved over an arch; it is bonded with mortar.
2. A continuous row or layer of material, as shingles, tiles, etc.

course

course
courseclick for a larger image
i. The intended direction of flight. The aircraft heading as measured in the horizontal plane in degrees clock-wise from the north. The course is indicated by a single arrow in the air plot.
ii. The ILS (instrument landing system) localizer signal pattern, usually specified as front course or back course.
iii. The intended track along a straight, curved, or segmented microwave landing system path.
References in periodicals archive ?
The two-level theorist I am envisaging is partly right: in virtue of my concern with the continuance of Tibetan culture, and the associated disposition to exclude courses of action which are incompatible with its continuance, it is legitimate to ascribe to me the aim of not aiding in the destruction of Tibetan culture.
We can make sense of the idea that I have negative ends associated with each of these concerns: I aim not to "act against" either one of these ends, and so am disposed to exclude from my deliberation courses of action which would be incompatible with either of them, as Exclusion claims.
It would be unsatisfying simply to assert as a brute, conceptual fact about concerns that they involve dispositions to exclude certain courses of action from deliberation.
Granting that an agent has a pro tanto reason not to take a course of action incompatible with an end she cares about (and that it is not unreasonable of her to care about), why is it not an adequate deliberative response to this pro tanto reason for the agent simply to attach a quantum of disvalue to courses of action incompatible with that end, proportional to the strength of the reason she has not to take it--to be weighed in deliberation against the positive value of those courses of action, so that the net value of those courses of action may be compared to the net value of the other courses of action open to her?
Now, either (a) the course of action has been constructed to maximize goal attainment and therefore its selection is automatic, or (b) the alternative courses of action are measured in turn against the goal and that course of action deemed to maximize goalattainment is selected.
A third set refers to the activity of designing courses of action to achieve goals:
The criterion of choice in originative decisions is direct preference for one set of consequences in comparison with the consequences of other courses of action. (10) Direct preference is a variable, then, that gains specific value only in the individual case.
On the other hand, in an originative decision, courses of action are compared with each other, so there must always be at least two courses.
Each coder categorized the strategies used for generating courses of action. Of the 78 courses of action studied, 95% were considered to be recognized, 4% were considered to be selected from multiple options, and 1% were novel actions.
They were using their situation awareness to recognize and then implement a course of action, not to compare alternative courses of action or to generate new courses of action.
In these cases they described how they evaluated the courses of action and the criteria they used for selecting or rejecting the action.
The most important decisions were judgments about the nature of the situation, not selections between alternative courses of action. Diagnosis requires that a decision maker perceive the need to adopt a hypothesis to explain observed events, generate one or more potential hypotheses, and evaluate them.