Covenanter


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Covenanter

a person upholding the National Covenant of 1638 or the Solemn League and Covenant of 1643 between Scotland and England to establish and defend Presbyterianism
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Chignecto Covenanters: A Regional History of Reformed Presbyterians in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, 1827-1905 by Eldon Hay (McGill-Queen's, 1996, $39.95).
The second part of the Blasphemy, I argue, was a later addition to the christological tract which, consistent with the second title on the title page, was directed "Against the horrible and greatest blasphemy of Jan van Leiden." Its focus is on a once true Covenanter who was now promoting the use of the sword to advance the Kingdom.
Carlton's contention (6) that state formation is a top-down activity is contradicted by the Jan Glete's studies of the United Provinces and the accomplishments of the Scottish covenanters in 1638-41.
From Old Mortality's endless pilgrimage restoring Covenanter gravestones to Alison Wilson's ritualized care of Milnewood after Henry Morton's presumed death, most of the rituals in Old Mortality are symbolic actions operating in a culture struggling over symbols.
The crowd tried to emulate the achievements of their Covenanter ancestors in order to seek a new era of organized activism and social mobilization (see Krull 725-26).
Conceivably the Robert Allan who wrote "The Covenanter's Lament' (no.
Along the way, from the Covenanter incursion into Northumberland and the English rout at Newburn in August 1640 to Charles's departure from Westminster, sixteen months later, to Hampton Court where 'all five members of the royal family were forced to share the same bed', Adamson's eye for colourful detail is evident.
LEGAL COMMENTARY: A covenant by a physician not to compete is not against public policy if it is intended to protect a legitimate interest of the covenantee and is not so broad as to be oppressive to the covenanter or the public.
(14) For example, after the Battle of Philliphaugh in 1645 the Covenanter army slaughtered all prisoners including women and children to the cry of "Jesus and no quarter" (Smout 64).
As a covenanter, he is committed to defending an idea of the nation against the threat of corruption.
Subscribing to the doctrine of the two kingdoms associated with the Scottish reformer Andrew Melville, they held that Jesus Christ alone was governor of the Church and denounced the attempts of statesmen to regulate religious affairs as infringements of His kingly rights.(37) At the Glorious Revolution, complained one Irish Covenanter, `the Government did usurp and arrogate an Erastian and Antichristian Supremacy, encroaching upon the prerogative of the Lord Jesus Christ, his incommunicable Headship and Kingship'.(38) Those who remained faithful to the Covenanting ideal therefore censured the Church of Scotland for submitting to the Erastian control of an uncovenanted king and settling for Presbyterianism in one kingdom.
In his study of Robert Burns intended for the Encyclopedia Britannica and at first rejected as being 'too frankly critical and too little in accordance with Scotch tradition', Stevenson is too much a moralist, the Conscience of the Covenanter, in conflict with the Bohemian he always at heart remained.