cover crops


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cover crops

[′kəv·ər ‚kräps]
(agriculture)
Crops, especially grasses, grown for the express purpose of preventing and protecting a bare soil surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Educators shared information with local growers on current, ongoing agronomy research in southern Illinois, including cover crop and nutrient management trials, nitrogen management in corn and milo, and drilled soybean population.
At present the only similar option available to farmers through the Agri-Environment Climate Scheme (AECS) was to establish an annual patch of cover crops.
Amid growing concerns about topsoil loss, no-till and cover crops are becoming more popular, according to the 2017 US Census of Agriculture.
Importantly, winter hardy cover crops also reduced horseweed size inequality - meaning fewer large horseweed plants were found at the time of herbicide application.
Common organic farming practices for increasing soil nitrogen include using certified amendments, such as manures, or growing cover crops (Finckh et al.
Once again, more trees were damaged in treatments without cover crops (Tables 1, 4).
This year was no different, except that I'm married to a person with a cover crop passion, coupled with a powerful drive to build soil and reap its benefits.
Cover crops are a great way to add natural organic fertilizer to an area while providing additional forage for the pigs to consume.
Cover crops also limit erosion and often provide food for bees and other pollinators.
Cover crops may directly affect the soil's physical properties through mechanical action of its root system, or indirectly by promoting soil cover and intake of plant residues.
Cover crops sown after harvest, before spring crops are planted, provide winter cover and also act as a 'water pump', with the plant drawing moisture from the soil and into the air, where it evaporates, preventing valuable nutrients leaching from the soil.
A recent analysis of satellite data by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and the Practical Farmers of Iowa found that roughly 600,000 acres, or 2.6 percent of the state's corn and soybean fields, had cover crops over the 2015-16 winter.