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cover

1. woods or bushes providing shelter or a habitat for wild creatures
2. 
a. a blanket used on a bed for warmth
b. another word for bedspread
3. Philately
a. an entire envelope that has been postmarked
b. on cover (of a postage stamp) kept in this form by collectors
4. Pop music a version by a different artist of a previously recorded musical item
5. Cricket
a. the area more or less at right angles to the pitch on the off side and usually about halfway to the boundary
b. (as modifier): a cover drive by a batsman
c. a fielder in such a position
6. Ecology the percentage of the ground surface covered by a given species of plant
7. break cover (esp of game animals) to come out from a shelter or hiding place
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Cover

In reinforced concrete, the thickness of concrete over-lying the steel bars nearest the surface. An adequate layer is needed to protect the reinforcement from rusting and from fire.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cover

 

(or covering), a collection of point sets (geometric figures) whose union forms or contains a given set (or given figure). For example, the diagonal of a rectangle divides it into two triangles that form a cover of the given rectangle. Finite covers—that is, covers consisting of a finite number of elements —are usually considered. If the diameter of each of the sets of a cover is smaller than a given positive ∊, the cover is called an ∊-cover.

For any ∊ > 0, a bounded region permits of a finite ∊-cover by closed sets with at most three sets intersecting at a time, but it permits of no such cover, for a sufficiently small ∊, with only two sets intersecting at a time. Thus, a town square can be covered with arbitrarily small paving blocks in such a way that the stones in the pavement will border only in threes; borderings in threes cannot be avoided. Similarly, when a space is filled with brickwork, the bricks can be made to border only in fours; the borderings cannot be only in threes. Hence, the importance of the concept of the multiplicity of a cover. We say that the multiplicity of a cover of a given set does not exceed n if every point of the set belongs to no more than n sets of the cover. Thus, the multiplicity of finite covers makes it possible to characterize the number of dimensions of a space. In topology, covers are a powerful means of investigating various geometric properties of sets.

P. S. ALEKSANDROV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

cover

[′kəv·ər]
(mathematics)
An element, x, of a partially ordered set covers another element y if x is greater than y, and the only elements that are both greater than or equal to y and less than or equal to x are x and y themselves.
also covering
(mining engineering)
The thickness of rock between the mine workings and the surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cover

1. In reinforced concrete, the least distance between the surface of the reinforcement and the outer surface of the concrete.
2. That part of a tile or shingle which is covered by the next course.
3. The concrete (or concrete-like material) which covers steel reinforcement to protect the steel from possible fire damage or corrosion.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cover

i. An area on the ground covered by imagery, photograph, mosaic, etc.
ii. The protection of friendly forces (ground, maritime, or air) by friendly aircraft and/or by EW (electronic warfare) aircraft.
iii. That which conceals or protects, such as darkness, a topographical feature, a bank of clouds, a shell barrage, or a deceptive move.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Situation 5: The facts are the same as in Situation 1, except that A is not covered by a health FSA.
Most employee benefit plans that are covered by ERISA are also affected by the Internal Revenue Code.
Smaller rollers, from a few centimeters to nearly a meter in length, have been covered with elastomeric alloys using insert injection molding and then machining the roll cover to tightly toleranced dimensions.
And there is likely to be an upper limit to the value of each item that is covered.
In economies such as Malaysia, Thailand, Hong Kong and India, which do not currently have covered bond-specific legal frameworks, market development may take a longer time.
The rating was assigned to Danske Bank's NOK500m (USD85.4m/EUR61.3m) covered bonds due 2025.
The regulations impose a restriction on the use of the SCM by requiring the taxpayer to "reasonably conclude in its business judgment that the covered services do not contribute significantly to key competitive advantages, core capabilities, or fundamental risks of success or failure in one or more trades or businesses of the renderer, the recipient, or both.
While the process is similar to that of other plans' P&T committees, "where we may be a bit different is when we put a drug on formulary, everything is covered on our benefit unless it's specifically excluded," said William Fleming, vice president of pharmacy and clinical integration.
To date, Hefner covered its rolls with calendered sheets according to the winding principle.
Estate and gift tax planning written communications usually are tailored to a client's situation, which may make compliance with Circular 230's covered opinion regulations (Sec.