Greed

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Related to covetousness: 7 Deadly Sins

Greed

See also Stinginess.
Almayer’s Folly
lust for gold leads to decline. [Br. Lit.: Almayer’s Folly]
Alonso
Shakespearean symbol of avarice. [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]
Béline
fans husband’s hypochondria to get his money. [Fr. Lit.: Le Malade Imaginaire]
Barak’s wife
agrees to sell shadow, symbol of her fertility. [Aust. Opera: R. Strauss, Woman Without a Shadow, Westerman, 432]
Brown, Joe
turns in partner Joe Christmas for reward money. [Am. Lit.: Light in August]
Common Lot, The
the get-rich-quick club. [Am. Lit.: The Common Lot, Hart, 369]
Crawley, Pitt
inherits, marries, and hoards money. [Br. Lit.: Vanity Fair]
Eugénie Grandet
wealth as raison d’être. [Fr. Lit.: Eugenie Grandet, Magill I, 258–260]
Financier, The
riches as raison d’être. [Am. Lit.: The Financier, Magill I, 280–282]
Gehazi
behind master’s back, takes money he declined. [O.T.: II Kings 5:21–22]
Griffiths, Clyde
insatiable desire for wealth causes his downfall. [Am. Lit.: An American Tragedy]
Hoard, Walkadine
hastily marries courtesan posing as wealthy widow. [Br. Lit.: A Trick to Catch the Old One]
Kibroth-hattaavah
Hebrew place name: where greedy were buried. [O.T.: Numbers, 11:33–35]
Lucre, Pecunious
duped into succoring profligate nephew by lure of a fortune. [Br. Lit.: A Trick To Catch the Old One]
Mammon
avaricious fallen angel. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Mammon, Sir Epicure
avaricious knight; seeks philosopher’s stone for Midas touch. [Br. Lit.: The Alchemist]
Mansion, The
shows material advantages of respectability winning over kinship. [Am. Lit.: The Mansion, Hart, 520]
Midas
greedy king whose touch turned everything to gold. [Classical Myth.: Bulfinch, 42–44]
Montgomery
mercenary chief proverbially kept for himself all the booty. [Fr. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 618]
Naboth’s Vineyard
another’s possession gotten, by hook or crook. [O.T.: I Kings, 21]
New Grub Street
place of ruthless contest among moneymongers. [Br. Lit.: New Grub Street, Magill I, 647–649]
Osmond, Gilbert
marries Isabel Archer for her money. [Am. Lit.: The Portrait of a Lady, Magill I, 766–768]
Overreach, Sir Giles
grasping usurer, unscrupulous and ambitious. [Br. Lit.: A New Way to Pay Old Debts, Wheeler, 275]
Pardoner’s Tale
three brothers kill each other for treasure. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Pardoner’s Tale”]
pig
medieval symbol of avarice. [Art: Hall, 247]
Putnam, Abbie
marries old man in anticipation of inheritance. [Am. Lit.: Desire Under the Elms]
Scrooge, Ebenezer
byword for greedy miser. [Br. Lit.: A Christmas Carol]
Sisyphus
condemned to impossible task for his avarice. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler, 1011]
References in periodicals archive ?
Terrorism signals a collapse of hospitality due either to unbridled covetousness or endemic injustice or, often, the synergy of both.
Western democracy, the culture of argument and tolerance - in contrast to Eastern despotism and fanaticism, in contrast to Southern covetousness and irresponsibility, further in contrast to European vanity and German unbearableness - alone led to the happiness of mankind.
'However, greed was born and, although <it> just freed <itself> from the hands of virtues, stood erect, and covetousness crept in to substitute generosity; for he tried hard to gain profit in any <possible> way in order to have in abundance <what> to give away, nor was he ashamed to seize what he would disburse, whereas generosity should not exceed the limit of <our> resources, nor is it praiseworthy to give away what has been acquired by fraud' (my translation here and below).
In his explanation of the last sentence in his book "In the Shadows of the Qur'an," Egyptian scholar Sayyed Qutub said: The covetousness of the soul is a detriment to good work which is represented by all sorts of voluntary giving including money, compassion, help and others.
envy: a feeling of discontent or covetousness with regard to another's advantages, success, possessions
Covetousness (whether for riches, power or prestige) has been christened by contemporary society; now it's called ambition, discriminating taste, wanting "the good life," a.k.a.
Fueled by a consumerist culture, many find themselves battling the sin of greed (sometimes referred to as "covetousness" or "avarice").
Main character carves out his own brand of catharsis from such unlikely material as his daughter's engagement party -- which includes a surreal remembrance ceremony for her fiance's father, who drowned two years earlier -- and a gnawing covetousness for the watch his shrink never lets out of the clenched left hand buried in his trouser pocket.
Interestingly, betrayal is not one of the seven deadly sins (sloth, gluttony, envy, lust, covetousness, anger and pride) but it is often driven by one of these traits.
But there is also covetousness: The ship's major-domo (Campbell Scott, outfitted with a dueling scar and strangulated German accent) wants to claim for himself a steward (Lili Taylor), and so separates her from an ingenuous suitor (Matt McGrath, performing with accents of Italian bafflement).
Delumeau, 1990, 214, 220-21, has pointed out that the percentage of written material dealing with problems of "concupiscence" was much smaller, for instance, than that dealing with "covetousness" and "pride."