Greed

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Related to covetousness: 7 Deadly Sins

Greed

See also Stinginess.
Almayer’s Folly
lust for gold leads to decline. [Br. Lit.: Almayer’s Folly]
Alonso
Shakespearean symbol of avarice. [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]
Béline
fans husband’s hypochondria to get his money. [Fr. Lit.: Le Malade Imaginaire]
Barak’s wife
agrees to sell shadow, symbol of her fertility. [Aust. Opera: R. Strauss, Woman Without a Shadow, Westerman, 432]
Brown, Joe
turns in partner Joe Christmas for reward money. [Am. Lit.: Light in August]
Common Lot, The
the get-rich-quick club. [Am. Lit.: The Common Lot, Hart, 369]
Crawley, Pitt
inherits, marries, and hoards money. [Br. Lit.: Vanity Fair]
Eugénie Grandet
wealth as raison d’être. [Fr. Lit.: Eugenie Grandet, Magill I, 258–260]
Financier, The
riches as raison d’être. [Am. Lit.: The Financier, Magill I, 280–282]
Gehazi
behind master’s back, takes money he declined. [O.T.: II Kings 5:21–22]
Griffiths, Clyde
insatiable desire for wealth causes his downfall. [Am. Lit.: An American Tragedy]
Hoard, Walkadine
hastily marries courtesan posing as wealthy widow. [Br. Lit.: A Trick to Catch the Old One]
Kibroth-hattaavah
Hebrew place name: where greedy were buried. [O.T.: Numbers, 11:33–35]
Lucre, Pecunious
duped into succoring profligate nephew by lure of a fortune. [Br. Lit.: A Trick To Catch the Old One]
Mammon
avaricious fallen angel. [Br. Lit.: Paradise Lost]
Mammon, Sir Epicure
avaricious knight; seeks philosopher’s stone for Midas touch. [Br. Lit.: The Alchemist]
Mansion, The
shows material advantages of respectability winning over kinship. [Am. Lit.: The Mansion, Hart, 520]
Midas
greedy king whose touch turned everything to gold. [Classical Myth.: Bulfinch, 42–44]
Montgomery
mercenary chief proverbially kept for himself all the booty. [Fr. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 618]
Naboth’s Vineyard
another’s possession gotten, by hook or crook. [O.T.: I Kings, 21]
New Grub Street
place of ruthless contest among moneymongers. [Br. Lit.: New Grub Street, Magill I, 647–649]
Osmond, Gilbert
marries Isabel Archer for her money. [Am. Lit.: The Portrait of a Lady, Magill I, 766–768]
Overreach, Sir Giles
grasping usurer, unscrupulous and ambitious. [Br. Lit.: A New Way to Pay Old Debts, Wheeler, 275]
Pardoner’s Tale
three brothers kill each other for treasure. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Pardoner’s Tale”]
pig
medieval symbol of avarice. [Art: Hall, 247]
Putnam, Abbie
marries old man in anticipation of inheritance. [Am. Lit.: Desire Under the Elms]
Scrooge, Ebenezer
byword for greedy miser. [Br. Lit.: A Christmas Carol]
Sisyphus
condemned to impossible task for his avarice. [Gk. Myth.: Wheeler, 1011]
References in periodicals archive ?
And if we can reduce covetousness, we can begin to say the reverse: the merrier, the more.
A kind of inverse connectedness among the vices might seem to be implied here, cowardice leading to covetousness and covetousness leading to deceit, but the green girdle has none of the visual unity and symbolic complexity elaborated on by the poet in the case of the pentangle.
Not that a bit of liberal use of the gifts of creation should be condemned as bad in itself, but covetousness is always vicious.
The P's stand for the seven deadly sins (sin in Latin is peccatum): pride, envy, wrath, sloth, covetousness, gluttony, lust, each to be wiped away in turn as the pilgrim moves from cornice to cornice.
for no other reason than covetousness and pride, as a result of which you have deserved eternal death and sure damnation.
Sorrentino understands the covetousness of the art collector--"Rapacity plus taste is a formidable combination since it so often passes for intelligence" (182)--and when he's got past the epigrams, he makes us laugh, sometimes with De Vriesian one-liners: "I know a woman who married a novelist and divorced him two years later, because he was 'always writing'" (136).
Dyment deserves great credit, as a professed centre-left Canadian of a pretty conventional hue, for seeing that the United States is not an evil country foaming and heaving with covetousness for the pure snow maiden of the North.
Although the use of strong, emotional and religious languages in these scam appeals to the unsuspecting user, research has shown that weaknesses in the human nature such as greed, covetousness and gullibility are exploited to the advantages of the scammers [Cukier et al, 2007; Reich, 2004; Tony, 2009].
Is it because of covetousness or deprivation or South Sudanese people are not worth to be treated as human beings?
O monks, whoever monk is covetous and has (his) covetousness not yet abandoned .
There are, however, circumstances which really contribute to strengthen their covetousness and support their constancy; they occasionally discover underground vast caverns of very solid construction, containing an immense number of corpses deposited there at some very distant period.
All these money-making techniques, legal or illegal, show an element of covetousness and greed.