cow parsley


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Related to cow parsley: cow parsnip

cow parsley

a common Eurasian umbelliferous hedgerow plant, Anthriscus sylvestris, having umbrella-shaped clusters of white flowers
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cow parsley

cow parsley

Hollow stem, grows to 6 ft (2m), common roadside plant. Has somewhat unpleasant flavor, stronger than garden chervil with hint of carrot. Leaves used as anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, anti-spasmodic, anti-viral and fungal. Expectorant (cough, cold, asthma) used for depression, stress, insomnia, Alzheimers, Parkinson’s, crohn’s, diabetes, leukemia, kidney, stomach, digestive dosorders, dropsy, migranes. Leaves used for green dye. Flowers decorative uses. Causes uterine contractions, do not take while pregnant.
References in periodicals archive ?
BUDDING ROMANCE Valerian, above, cow parsley, right and Gypsophila, below, add a foaty, romantic feel
Cow parsley ydi'r enw Saesneg arno fo, er mi wnaeth 'na rywun rywbryd drio newid yr enw i Queen Anne's Lace am nad oedd o'n meddwl fod yr enw Cow Parsley yn ddigon posh, ond methiant fu'r ymgais a Cow Parsley ydi o byth.
This cow parsley has deep purple-black foliage that will add depth to a white garden.
Whether your garden is in deepest shade or brightest sun, on heavy clay or freedraining sand, there will be a selection Carol with cow parsley that will thrive and provide much-needed sustenance.
Now the hedges and woods are shimmering with flowers of cow parsley and elder.
Their blue flower-heads, surrounded by a spiky ruff, put them in the same family as cow parsley, and herbs such as dill and fennel - but you'd never guess it to look demands a closer look.
They are about 10ft tall and look a bit like giant cow parsley. Last weekend I started to chop them down as they had grown too big and my forearms are now covered in ugly blisters.
Flying insects love cow parsley Encourage the right insects to help keep pests at bay double-flowered varieties, because
The "nitrogen guzzlers", which also include cow parsley and creeping buttercup, thrive in nitrogen-rich soils caused in part by pollution from road traffic which settles on road verges, wildlife charity Plantlife said.
Aggressive, nutrient-demanding species such as stinging nettles and cow parsley have to give way here to more delicate plants.