cow parsnip


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Related to cow parsnip: wild parsnip
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cow parsnip

cow parsnip

(an edible plant) Can grow to 8 ft tall and has similar white flower clusters to poison hemlock, but the leaves are WAY different. Cow parsnip leaves are like big maple leaves, where poison hemlock leaves look like parsley leaves. Cow parsnip stems, leaves, buds and flowers can be eaten raw, steamed or cooked. Young leaves are better than the older ones. Roots are edible, but usually way too bitter and spicy to tolerate. Dry roots first before using. Be aware that the juice that comes out of the plant when harvesting might be too strong for some people and cause a rash. Test first. Also, do not confuse this plant with giant hogweed, which looks similar and grows very tall, so become VERY familiar with the leaf differences!
References in periodicals archive ?
Wildwood Regional Park, west end of Avenida de los Arboles, Thousand Oaks: Look for shooting star, cow parsnip, chocolate lily, slender coreopsis, gold field, prickly phlox, flowering gooseberry, white stem filaree, bladder pod, Indian paintbrush.
Desperate hunger abated, the bears took up residence in the lowlands, munching on salads of cow parsnip and angelica, sometimes even grazing placidly on grass within sight of hoofed neighbors.
The "National Audubon Society First Field Guides Series" will enable young nature enthusiasts to easily identify and distinguish bird species such as the Great Blue Heron, the Horned Puffin and the Cattle Egret; rocks and minerals including Sandstone, Pyrite, and Emerald; species of insects such as the Praying Mantis, the Giant Waterbug and the American Snout Butterfly; and wildflowers including Blackfoot Daisies, Rattlesnake Weed, and Cow Parsnip just to name a few.
In the Cascades, for example, Western columbine clusters in the partial shade of cow parsnip.