crack

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crack:

see cocainecocaine
, alkaloid drug derived from the leaves of the coca shrub. A commonly abused illegal drug, cocaine has limited medical uses, most often in surgical applications that take advantage of the fact that, in addition to its anesthetic effect, it constricts small arteries,
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

What does it mean when you dream about cracks?

Can represent a flaw or weakness. A crack in a dream could be drawing on the meaning of an idiom, such as “papering over the cracks,” “cracking up,” or “falling through the cracks.”

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

crack

[krak]
(chemistry)
To break a compound into simpler molecules.
(engineering)
To open something slightly, for instance, a valve.
(science and technology)
A fissure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crack

A building defect consisting of complete or incomplete separation within a single element or between contiguous elements of constructions.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crack

1. a break or fracture without complete separation of the two parts
2. a physical or mental defect; flaw
3. a broken or cracked tone of voice, as a boy's during puberty
4. Slang a processed form of cocaine hydrochloride used as a stimulant. It is highly addictive
5. Obsolete slang a burglar or burglary
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

crack

To break into. See cracker.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When we were kids, it had to be the golden age of sportscasting--Bob Murphy, Ralph Kiner, and Lindsey Nelson shared the Mets TV and radio chores; Marry Glickman was calling Giants, then Jets, games; Pat Summerall and Tom Brookshire were the best football tandem around; Curt Gowdy seemed to be at every major event imaginable; Dandy Don Meredith was cracking wise (and funny) in the Monday Night Football booth ...
In "Doonesbury," the news media's so-called "recount" of disputed presidential election ballots in Florida is depicted as a rollicking affair in which reporters shuffle through punch cards while cracking wise about chads.
He was somebody who would wander into work, sit around cracking wise with other people cracking wise, and then go off and cover a set event that other reporters would be at.
Archers on the flanks were cracking wise about the Queen's fey scribe sent along to write the whole thing up.
As it turned out, not only was he still kicking, but he was still blowing as well as or better than ever, and cracking wise to boot.