crackle

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crackle

1. intentional crazing in the glaze of a piece of porcelain or pottery
2. porcelain or pottery so decorated

Crackle

 

a network of fine cracks on the glazed surface of ceramic goods. Crackle is created for ornamental effect, using the difference in the expansion coefficients of the crock and the glaze during firing.

crackle

In painting, a paint or lacquer designed to develop a network of fine cracks when applied over a softer undercoat.
References in classic literature ?
As the inrush of birds continued, their wings beating against the crackling rushes, Lady Arabella grew pale, and almost fainted.
It was Catherine Cusack who told me of it," said he in a crackling voice.
A circle of fire hemmed the Victoria in; the crackling of the dry wood mingled with the hissing and sputtering of the green branches; the clambering vines, the foliage, all the living part of this vegetation, writhed in the destructive element.
Below the height on which the Kiev regiment was stationed, in the hollow where the rivulet flowed, the soul-stirring rolling and crackling of musketry was heard, and much farther to the right beyond the dragoons, the officer of the suite pointed out to Bagration a French column that was outflanking us.
She sent a sheet of crackling flame rushing over the meadow to consume them; and for the first time the Scarecrow became afraid and turned to fly.
They lurked for me in the forest glades; leaped up, striking, under my feet; squirmed off through the dry grass or across naked patches of rock; or pursued me into the tree-tops, encircling the trunks with their great shining bodies, driving me higher and higher or farther and farther out on swaying and crackling branches, the ground a dizzy distance beneath me.
Again and again they strove, their foreheads beaded with sweat, their frames crackling with the effort.
A coal fire was crackling in the grate and the lamps were lit, for it was already beginning to grow dark outside.
This is how he tells of the way in which Aeneas saved his old father by carrying him on his shoulders out of the burning town of Troy when "The crackling flame was heard throughout the walls, and more and more the burning heat drew near.
Old Tarwater could shame them all, despite his creaking and crackling and the nasty hacking cough he had developed.
His lamp was lit, there were logs hissing and crackling upon the fire.
Meanwhile men ran to and fro, talking merrily together, their steps crackling on the platform as they continually opened and closed the big doors.