cradle

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cradle

1. a frame, rest, or trolley made to support or transport a piece of equipment, aircraft, ship, etc.
2. a platform, cage, or trolley, in which workmen are suspended on the side of a building or ship
3. a holder connected to a computer allowing data to be transferred from a PDA, digital camera, etc.
4. another name for creeper
5. a framework used to prevent the bedclothes from touching a sensitive part of an injured person

cradle

[′krād·əl]
(civil engineering)
A structure that moves along an inclined track on a riverbank and is equipped with a horizontal deck carrying tracks for transferring railroad cars to and from boats at different water elevations.
(engineering)
A framework or other resting place for supporting or restraining objects.
(ordnance)
The nonrecoiling structure of a weapon that houses the recoiling parts and rotates to elevate the gun.
(textiles)
A device that catches the cards as they fall from a jacquard head.

cradle

2. The structural support for a pipe which is placed below and to one side of the pipe.

cradle

A holder into which a portable device is placed. Cradles typically have a plug or socket that matches up with the connector on the unit. The term often refers to cradles in a dock that hold smartphones and tablets for transferring content and charging. Cradles are also used to charge the removable batteries in digital cameras and cordless hand tools. See Apple dock, Android dock and HDD cradle.
References in periodicals archive ?
19 April 2001: Tracy Childers, Travis Cradler, Edward Dodge, Aaron
"CARET was developed to meet the longstanding need for educators and policymakers to have easy, on-demand, access to research and evaluation findings that will inform important technology planning and funding decisions," said John Cradler, President of Educational Support Systems (ESS).
Today, our culture is becoming more technological as we spend more time watching television (e.g., Neuman, 1991) and using computers (Coley, Cradler, a, Engel, 1997).
CUTLINE: Students and faculty in JA Academy who also are involved in the Advancement Via Individual Determination program at Burncoat Senior High School in Worcester are, from left, Alba Quezada, 18, Ashley Noyst, 17, Angel Torres, 17, AVID coordinator and biology teacher Judy Cradler, Samuel Andino, 17, and Katherine Rodriguez, 18.
Similar results were reported by Coley, Cradler, & Engel (1997) who found that only few teachers tried to employ the Internet in their classrooms, and they lacked the necessary skills needed for efficient use.