cradle

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cradle

1. a frame, rest, or trolley made to support or transport a piece of equipment, aircraft, ship, etc.
2. a platform, cage, or trolley, in which workmen are suspended on the side of a building or ship
3. a holder connected to a computer allowing data to be transferred from a PDA, digital camera, etc.
4. another name for creeper
5. a framework used to prevent the bedclothes from touching a sensitive part of an injured person

cradle

[′krād·əl]
(civil engineering)
A structure that moves along an inclined track on a riverbank and is equipped with a horizontal deck carrying tracks for transferring railroad cars to and from boats at different water elevations.
(engineering)
A framework or other resting place for supporting or restraining objects.
(ordnance)
The nonrecoiling structure of a weapon that houses the recoiling parts and rotates to elevate the gun.
(textiles)
A device that catches the cards as they fall from a jacquard head.

cradle

2. The structural support for a pipe which is placed below and to one side of the pipe.

cradle

A holder into which a portable device is placed. Cradles typically have a plug or socket that matches up with the connector on the unit. The term often refers to cradles in a dock that hold smartphones and tablets for transferring content and charging. Cradles are also used to charge the removable batteries in digital cameras and cordless hand tools. See Apple dock, Android dock and HDD cradle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Training and support models that may achieve this objective have been outlined by the International Society for Technology in Education and offer a comprehensive, research based model for professional development and technology support (Cradler & Cradler, 2002).
Research indicates that it takes a great deal of education and experience to achieve a comfortable level of expertise in the use of technology as a tool for helping students learn (Coley, Cradler, & Engel, 1997; ISTE, 1999; Milken Family Foundation, 2001; NCATE, 1997; Thomas & Cooper, 2000; U.
The availability of research on the topic is less extensive and more difficult to organize because critical thinking skills have historically been more difficult to evaluate (Coley, Cradler, & Engel, 1997).
Among them are the natural, the tortoise, the cradler, the talker and the general.