cranial capacity


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cranial capacity

[′krān·ē·əl kə′pas·əd·ē]
(anatomy)
The volume of the cranial cavity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mean cranial capacity of the lion, dog and cat was 207.4[+ or -]24.49, 86.4[+ or -]11.87 and 20.8[+ or -]1.95 cm3 respectively (Saber & Gummow).
Cranial capacity can be calculated as per the formula given below.
Excavated at Dmanisi, Georgia, an area at the crossroads of Africa, Asia and Europe, the early human skulls of Dmanisi contradicted the assumptions about first migrants out of Africa since the fossils found were already there 1.77 million years ago and were physically small in built (weight of 40-50 kilograms; height of 1.40-1.50 meters) and has smaller brains (cranial capacity of 543-775 cubic centimeters).
Increased cranial capacity in hominid evolution and preeclampsia.
"We found a positive relationship between absolute latitude and both eye socket size and cranial capacity," lead author Eiluned Pearce told BBC News.
Human cranial capacity ranges from 1200 to 1850 cc's and there is sexual dimorphism, which means that men and women have different skull ridges, lines, palates, orbits and sinuses.
But then I was struck by a group of even more limited cranial capacity. Fanzine editors.
(2004), and use these to ask "How explosive was the growth of cranial capacity in hominids?" and "When and why did it begin?"
Australopithecines have a cranial capacity of around 400-450 cc.
Nor can the mere ratio between cranial capacity and body size account for the distinction.
Living in a time when women were thought to have more limited cranial capacity than men, Enola shows that she can be just as clever and resourceful as her older brother, the world-famous Sherlock Holmes.