craniofacial index

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craniofacial index

[¦krā·nē·ō′fā·shəl ′in‚deks]
(anthropology)
The ratio of the width of the cranium to the width of the face.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
While those results could be attributed in part to genetic drift, the researchers also found that other factors - such as adaptations to climate and altitude - also played a role in craniofacial differentiation between populations.
This atlas explains operative craniofacial surgery, focusing on the surgical techniques of the most common craniofacial procedures, rather than basic theoretical knowledge, including cranial vault and bony face, orbital, nose, maxilla and mandible, ear, and cleft lip and palate procedures.
The craniofacial variety of FD is a localized form of this pathology characterized by confluent involvement of adjacent bones of the cranium and skull base.
Rosen took her goal of spreading kindness and awareness on the road through workshops and talks, along with friends she met on the journey, and discovered a greater community of children with craniofacial abnormalities.
A simple and accurate craniofacial midsagittal plane definition.
A limited number of studies have examined craniofacial shape of subjects with OSAS using 3-D imaging with geometric morphometric methods (Banabilh et al., 2009, 2010).
Love Without Reason has partnered with hospitals in Zimbabwe and in India to provide nearly 500 surgeries for children and adults born with craniofacial birth defects, such as cleft lip, cleft palate, ankylosis, or micrognathia.
In addition, not only the hard but also the soft tissues of the craniofacial region can be observed in three dimensions.
Since joining CHOP in 2010, Dr Taylor was an attending surgeon in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the co-director of the Cleft Lip and Palate Programme as well as director of the Craniofacial Plastic Surgery Fellowship in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
The company was a Bronze Sponsor of an event in support of children with clefts and other craniofacial anomalies