craniometry


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craniometry

[‚krā·nē′äm·ə·trē]
(anthropology)
The science of measuring the skull, especially for determining characteristics of a particular race, sex, or somatotype.
References in periodicals archive ?
Craniometry was another emerging discipline which believed that the size of a skull could be used to determine intelligence.
The "scientific racists" employed several ludicrous techniques and theories, including craniometry (measurement of the bones of the skull) and phrenology (study of the "bumps" on heads to determine character, personality traits, and criminality), to prove the intellectual, moral, and ethic superiority of Europeans to non-Europeans.
In Mismeasure of Man, Stephen Jay Gould recounts numerous "bad arguments" within the frame of his own carefully reasoned "good" argument, a critique of nineteeth-century craniometry and twentieth-century intelligence testing that makes as explicit as possible the warrants, reservations, and qualifiers.
For Broca, the measurements of the skull, craniometry, gave a scientific validity to anthropology and provided the most accurate way to make racial discriminations.
3) This is, to be sure, a far cry from the April 1877 issue of Harper's New Monthly Magazine wherein anthropologists report on the craniometry of the "Gorilla," "Chimpanzee," "Bushwoman," and "European.
Scientists who supported this theory claimed that a racial hierarchy and the measurement of intelligence can be obtained by craniometry (accurate measurement of human skulls from around the world) and certain psychological and IQ tests.
that gave us figures like the "Hottentot Venus"; craniometry and its concepts of inferior races; Lombroso's famous "findings" about the physical stigmata of criminality; scholarly studies that underwrote the eugenics movement and the Holocaust; The Bell Curve.
This allows him to identify his own interests in such things as craniometry and landscape painting as interests that are not merely brought to Melville's texts, but are, at least in part, found there.
Morton's own craniometry had shown the Semite skull to be inferior to the Teuton.
At the same time that the European-American frontier was being pushed westward, a new and distinctively American "science" of craniometry was developing an "objective" method for differentiating among races (see Jeffries 156).
And as Stephen Jay Gould wrote in 1973 during another periodic flare-up of these old arguments, "What craniometry was to the nineteenth century, intelligence testing has been to the twentieth.