craniosynostosis


Also found in: Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

craniosynostosis

[‚krā·nē·ō‚sin·ə′stō·səs]
(medicine)
The union of separate cranial bones into a single bone structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A ser250trp (corrected) substitution in mouse fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (Fgfr2) results in craniosynostosis. Bone 2003;33(20): 169-78.
Until now, the surgeons had unknowingly destroyed the regenerative stem cells when operating on craniosynostosis patients.
ultrasound unit at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, said prenatal diagnosis of fetal craniosynostosis is often difficult, particularly if it involves the sagittal suture and occurs in the absence of a family history As a result, most cases are delivered without a diagnosis.
Board member for the Jorge Posada Foundation, a nonprofit organization established by former New York Yankees catcher Jorge Posada and his wife, Laura, in honor of their son and his successful struggle against craniosynostosis.
Variations and abnormalities of skull appearance and shape are often related to a primary maldevelopment of the brain.(1) The copper-beaten skull appearance is typically associated with craniosynostosis, which is the premature fusion of the cranial bone sutures (Fig.
The seemingly healthy infant needed a five-hour operation after being diagnosed with craniosynostosis, a rare condition where the skull doesn't develop properly.
The youngster had been born with a rare skull condition called craniosynostosis which, in serious cases, can lead to brain damage.
Their fear was justified and Ava was diagnosed with craniosynostosis which means the skull does not develop properly.
Syndromes, such as bilateral coronal craniosynostosis, require frontal augmentation10 (Figure-1).
They cover craniosynostosis, orbital dystopias, maxillary surgery, mandibular surgery, skull defects, frontal sinus, orbital trauma, nasal fractures, noe fractures, maxillary trauma, mandibular trauma, panfacial trauma, and pediatric trauma.
Upon delivery, he was noticed to have dysmorphic features including head circumference of 32 cm with craniosynostosis. Musculoskeletal examination (Figure 1) revealed shortened right forearm and fixed flexion of both wrist joints at about 30[degrees] with inability to extend.