crepe

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crepe

crepe (krāp), thin fabric of crinkled texture, woven originally in silk but now available in all major fibers. There are two kinds of crepe. The hard-finished, typically dyed black and used for mourning (which tends to retain the old spelling crape), is made of hand-twisted silk yarn and finished by a rather complex trade process after weaving; the soft crepes include the Canton, or Oriental, weaves (crepes de Chine) in plain or damask weaves. Their crisped or wavy appearance results from the peculiar arrangement of the weft, which is formed of yarn from two different bobbins twisted together in opposite directions or uses alternately a right-twisted and a left-twisted thread.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Crepe

 

a group of fabrics, primarily silk, made from threads with a very large (crepe) twist, and also, in some instances, special (crepe) interweavings. The most common types are crepe de Chine, chiffon crepe, crepe Georgette, and satin crepe.

Crepe is usually made with threads twisted to both the right and left in a specific alternation; this twisting of the threads, which gives them greater elasticity, causes the fabric to shrivel quite a bit, which in combination with the different directions of the twists, creates a slightly rough, shaded effect.

Crepe is made not only from silk, but also from silk mixture, cotton, wool, and wool mixture, and also with artificial and synthetic threads. The crepe effect is achieved in these fabrics primarily by using crepe and other somewhat patterned interweavings, frequently without the crepe twist. The advantages of crepe are that it drapes well and is crease resistant. It is used for women’s dresses and suits.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

crepe

[krāp]
(textiles)
A silk, polyester, wool, rayon, or other fabric with a crinkled surface obtained by using yarns twisted alternately right and left in the filling.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crepe

, crape
a. a light cotton, silk, or other fabric with a fine ridged or crinkled surface
b. (as modifier): a crepe dress
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
"Fine gal," said Rawdon, returning the salute which the cottage gave him, by two fingers applied to his crape hatband.
As the birds were pretty plentiful, and partridge shooting is as it were the duty of an English gentleman of statesmanlike propensities, Sir Pitt Crawley, the first shock of grief over, went out a little and partook of that diversion in a white hat with crape round it.
Hooper's face was behind that piece of crape," said the sexton.
Such was the effect of this simple piece of crape, that more than one woman of delicate nerves was forced to leave the meeting-house.
I make no manner of doubt but that, in this light, we may see the imaginary future chancellor just called to the bar, the archbishop in crape, and the prime minister at the tail of an opposition, more truly happy than those who are invested with all the power and profit of those respective offices.
On this last day, he was more elated and more proud than he had been yet; and when she dropped the book she had been reading to him aloud, and fell upon his neck, he stopped in his busy task of folding a piece of crape about his hat, and wondered at her anguish.
'Crape, keys, centre-bits, darkies--nothing forgotten?' inquired Toby: fastening a small crowbar to a loop inside the skirt of his coat.
Lucy, who had laid aside her black for the first time, and had her pretty slimness set off by an abundant dress of white crape, was the acknowledged queen of the occasion; for this was one of the Miss Guests' thoroughly condescending parties, including no member of any aristocracy higher than that of St.
On repairing thither, I found a man waiting for me, having the appearance of a gentleman's servant: he was dressed in deep mourning, and the hat he held in his hand was surrounded with a crape band.
He too looked down at the crape round his hat and replied -
He had appeared at the Epanchins' today with crape on his hat, and Princess Bielokonski had commended this action on his part.
And she is not in the least evangelical," said Rosamond, reflectively, as if that religious point of view would have fully accounted for perpetual crape. "And, not poor," she added, after a moment's pause.