crater pit

crater pit

[′krād·ər ‚pit]
(astronomy)
A small lunar crater with no raised walls surrounding it.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The Jordan Valley region is considered part of the Afro-Asian crater pit, one of the lowest in the world, located at a low of about 380 m below sea level.
The Great Rift, known as the Crater Pit, is one of the common names of a large geological rift more than 6,000 kilometers and 7 to 20 kilometers wide running through 22 countries from Turkey in western Asia to Mozambique in eastern Africa.
Atrash explained that the presence of the Dead Sea within the area of crater pit has helped in the migration of birds because the hot air currents rising from the ground help large birds, which is a feature of the nature of Palestine where flying birds use the rising air currents to travel distances from the Bekaa in Lebanon to the Gulf of Aqaba.
Conversely, glimpsing its small crater pit requires decent seeing, a low Sun angle, a telescope with an aperture of at least 4 or 6 inches, and high magnification.
To add to the mystery, a tiny crater pit now lay at the center of the spot.
"The Sun was behind it, so it was illuminated by a rim of gold which made the strangest appearances of the craters and crater pits, the contrast between the whiter than white and darker than dark."
"Instead, we found lots of bare rock, fresh lava flows on its flanks, and lots of small crater pits - evidence of fluid flow," he added.
The Lunar 100 L Feature Name Significance 69 Copernicus secondary craters Rays and cratelets near Pytheas 83 Plato craterlets Crater pits at limits of detection See Sky & Telescope: April 2004, page 113, or point your Web browser to SkyTonight.com/lunar100.
If you look carefully when the terminator is nearby, you will see that these intercrater plains are not completely smooth--they often feature a slightly rough texture due to small hillocks and crater pits. Now examine Baco, Cuvier, and Manzinus, and note how their floors are smoother and have fewer small impact pits than the area surrounding them.
Careful observations demonstrated that rays were centered on and extended from bright craters, had lengths proportional to their source crater's diameters, were discontinuous, crossed over high and low areas without deviation, and often contained tiny bright crater pits. Based on these observations and terrestrial experiences, two interpretations emerged, both based on a volcanic origin for the source craters.