Crawl space

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crawl space

[′krȯl ‚spās]
(building construction)
A shallow space in a building which workers can enter to gain access to pipes, wires, and equipment.
A shallow space located below the ground floor of a house and surrounded by the foundation wall.

Crawl space

The space under a suspended floor needed for access to services.

crawl space

crawl space, 2
1. Any interior space of limited height, but sufficient to permit workmen access to otherwise concealed ductwork, piping, or wiring.
2. In a building without a basement, an unfinished accessible space below the first floor which is usually less than a full story in height; normally enclosed by the foundation wall.
References in periodicals archive ?
The baseline model was what is being constructed currently: the crawlspace is conditioned, the attic is not.
Without a groundcover, crawlspace dew points can be much higher than outside air.
So, these walls should also be covered with a vapor barrier if the goal is to keep moisture out of your crawlspace.
2] concentrations as low as 14% in the crawlspace (normal air: 21%).
com, will be an invaluable resource for Marietta area homeowners who want to access information to address crawlspace encapsulation needs for their home or business.
When the attic is vented and the ventilation air enters the crawlspace it "sees" the two coldest surfaces in the space--the underside of the roof deck and the top of the insulation (Figure 5, Page 59).
The ZEMH has R-19 insulation on the above-grade crawlspace walls, while the ESTAR home has none.
With regard to insulation, our research in North Carolina shows that you can achieve great performance by either insulating the floor structure above the crawlspace or the perimeter wall around the crawlspace.
The best solution is to completely close up the vents (or omit them in new construction) and control crawlspace moisture in other ways.
At one house I helped restore, a pair of raccoons actually chewed and clawed through the roof sheathing, bent back a shingle and propped it open with another piece of shingle for easy access to the crawlspace.
Building on deep foundations and partly on a crawlspace.
It was sort of a tall crawlspace with a short crawlspace attached to one side.