creepage


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creepage

[′krē·pij]
(electricity)
The conduction of electricity across the surface of a dielectric.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
By developing AKM's original package, both creepage distance and clearance distance of 8 mm or more are achieved.
The apply of the locomotive dynamic braking force will increase the wheel/rail longitudinal creepage, and change the direction of the wheel/rail longitudinal creepage and let the longitudinal creep force to the major component of the total wheel/rail creep force.
The proposed method for calculating the tangential forces has been improved with respect to a previous method proposed by the authors [10], where the spin creepage was not adequately considered.
When the creepage is small, there is a linear relationship between creep force and creepage.
Results in rust creepage from the scribe during accelerated laboratory testing.
Valspar's Industrial Cold Galv Primer dries to a durable and crack-resistant coating, stops rust creepage and has excellent outdoor durability, resisting the corrosive effects of chemicals and salt.
* A small surface-mount package that meets the 8 mm creepage and clearance distance required for high-voltage safety regulations.
They include a spark analysis extension that is claimed to be the only available product to analyse and optimise the electromechanical clearance and creepage of designs.
And you can't blame headline writers for frequently resorting to the use of a word like "bottom" as they spend their days trying to make stories about stocks, shares, output and "headcount creepage" seem vaguely interesting.
IXYS' ISOPLUS packages provide high isolation capability (up to 2500V), improve creepage distance, and dramatically reduce total thermal resistance.
the failure of local, state, and federal government to address mental health issues is exposed." There was David Crawford's fascinating study in 1991 about the creepage of opinion onto the news pages.