creeping barrage


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creeping barrage

[′krē·piŋ bə′räzh]
(ordnance)
An artillery barrage that precedes infantry soldiers at a predetermined rate in their attack to protect them and facilitate their advance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Early in the morning of September 20 1917, Frederick's battalion was carrying out a "creeping barrage" in Glencorse Wood.
In the era of "surgical strikes" and surface-to-air missiles, the notion of trench warfare, bayonet charges and the creeping barrage seems other worldly.
The creeping barrage became standard and is mentioned about 50 times by the authors.
"We set off up to a chateau and our guns had carried out a creeping barrage on the approaches.
Whenever the Germans saw a creeping barrage approaching, it meant undoubtedly that infantry would, as doctrine dictated, be "leaning into the barrage" immediately behind.
"The Germans had gas shelled almost continuously at night, much heavy, carrying work had been done to supply artillery ammunition for the final bombardment and creeping barrage," Major Williams said.
Officers on horseback with flags, moving at the prescribed rate of advance, represented the creeping barrage. Troops carrying exactly what they would on the day of battle practiced rapidly exiting their jumping-off trench and following the rolling barrage over broken ground.
"I watched British troops cross the river at night under a spectacular creeping barrage," said Sid, "but the incident that is most vivid in my memory was the bombing and shelling of Monte Cassino Monastery.
And it was during this time that the British learned many strategic lessons, from more "hands on" methods of leadership to innovative fighting techniques such as the "creeping barrage".
By the spring of 1917, advances in the use of artillery resulted in the highly effective creeping barrage. The guns literally set the pace of the attack.