Kris

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Kris

 

(also creese), a side arm of many peoples of Malaysia and Indonesia, a steel dagger with a flame-shaped or serpentine ridged blade and a richly decorated handle made of wood, bone, or horn. The kris was formerly an obligatory part of male dress. Under colonial rule, only members of the aristocracy and rural authorities had the right to wear the kris. Today the kris is kept by families as an heirloom.

References in periodicals archive ?
By linking accents to competency, Creese demonstrates the prevalence of "accent discrimination" among Canadian employers.
I think Microsoft needs to worry about it now because it takes a while to get it right," Creese says.
Creese says unlike Google Docs, WebApps is a more polished product that closely resembles the real document.
This UK ensemble - Creese on double bass, pianist Gwilym Simcock, and Tim Garland on saxophones - are so relaxed with their music, and one another, that the only thing missing from the show was the ego that can accompany performance of this caliber.
Creese (2006) Managing bilingual interaction in a Gujarati complementary school in Leicester.
While Professor Creese will head up the team developing the technology to enable more control over data, experts at Oxford University and the LSE will tackle user requirements, the legal framework and regulation.
Creese cites the mounting security issues that MySpace has been facing--seen primarily in the news surrounding pedophilia--as possibly derailing this movement.
Alto sax player and leader Wates was aided by his cohorts Martin Shaw (trumpet/flugelhorn), Steve Kaldestad (tenor sax), Leon Greening (piano), Malcolm Creese (bass) and Matt Holme sitting in on drums - his introduction by Wates as a local boy earning him a notable ovation at the end of his solo slot.
Women of the Kakawin World: Marriage and Sexuality in the Indic Courts of Java and Bali By HELEN CREESE Armonk, NY: M.
Owners Tim and Ann Creese have made a family business to support other families through the decision process.
Stockton's only absentee is James Davidson but they have brought in five new players in Matthew Creese, Lee Daggart, Guy Darwin, Philip Walker and Pierre Mason.
Steedman and Creese discuss times in work history where discrimination based on gender was accepted as natural because male workers may be supporting families.