Kris

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kris

 

(also creese), a side arm of many peoples of Malaysia and Indonesia, a steel dagger with a flame-shaped or serpentine ridged blade and a richly decorated handle made of wood, bone, or horn. The kris was formerly an obligatory part of male dress. Under colonial rule, only members of the aristocracy and rural authorities had the right to wear the kris. Today the kris is kept by families as an heirloom.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
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