creosote


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creosote

(krē`əsōt), volatile, heavy, oily liquid obtained by the distillation of coal tar or wood tar. Creosote derived from beechwood tar has been used medicinally as an antiseptic and in the treatment of chronic bronchitis. Creosote obtained from coal tar is poisonous. It is used chiefly as a preservative for wood, e.g., in fence posts, railroad ties, and telephone poles, in which it provides protection against fungi, shipworms, and termites, and is also used as a pesticide and to treat psoriasis. Creosote is considered to be highly toxic and a likely carcinogen. It can leach out into the surrounding soil and groundwater, and the fumes exuded will kill young plants in close proximity.
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Creosote

A distillate of coal tar, used as a wood preservative.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

creosote

[′krē·ə‚sōt]
(materials)
A colorless or yellowish oily liquid containing a mixture of phenolic compounds obtained by distillation of tar; commercial creosote is distilled from coal tar, and pharmaceutical creosote is distilled from wood tar.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

creosote

An oily liquid obtained by distilling coal tar; used to impregnate wood (as a preservative) and to waterproof materials. Also called dead oil and pitch oil.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

creosote

1. a colourless or pale yellow liquid mixture with a burning taste and penetrating odour distilled from wood tar, esp from beechwood, contains creosol and other phenols, and is used as an antiseptic
2. a thick dark liquid mixture prepared from coal tar, containing phenols: used as a preservative for wood
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This report provides in depth study of "Creosote Oil Market" using SWOT analysis i.e.
All of our wooden poles are seasoned and treated as part of the manufacturing process, but creosote 'bleeding' like this is extremely rare."
"Creosote?" said the chap, trying to find the name.
The beams were then immersed in the desired preservative solution (creosote or copper naphthenate) and subjected to a 650 mm Hg vacuum for 20 minutes.
When cleaned properly, creosote is removed before it can ignite, but sometimes it builds up between cleanings, and the creosote catches fire.
The site, a 32-acre property in southeast Bogalusa, operated as a wood-treating facility from 1911 to 1953, with creosote used as the primary preservative.
Like cooking grease, creosote is a common cause of fires in restaurants that cook with solid fuel.
Some environmentalists are concerned that, over time, creosote from these poles leaks into the surrounding ground, polluting the environment.
A: It may be impossible to remove the creosote stains from the bricks, as it may have penetrated deeply.
The researchers suspected that creosote's activase proteins would remain relatively stable under most conditions.
Failure to remove creosote (an unburnt fuel deposited during wood burning) from hidden or inaccessible areas may result in a creosote-caused fire.