creosote

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creosote

(krē`əsōt), volatile, heavy, oily liquid obtained by the distillation of coal tar or wood tar. Creosote derived from beechwood tar has been used medicinally as an antiseptic and in the treatment of chronic bronchitis. Creosote obtained from coal tar is poisonous. It is used chiefly as a preservative for wood, e.g., in fence posts, railroad ties, and telephone poles, in which it provides protection against fungi, shipworms, and termites, and is also used as a pesticide and to treat psoriasis. Creosote is considered to be highly toxic and a likely carcinogen. It can leach out into the surrounding soil and groundwater, and the fumes exuded will kill young plants in close proximity.

Creosote

A distillate of coal tar, used as a wood preservative.

creosote

[′krē·ə‚sōt]
(materials)
A colorless or yellowish oily liquid containing a mixture of phenolic compounds obtained by distillation of tar; commercial creosote is distilled from coal tar, and pharmaceutical creosote is distilled from wood tar.

creosote

An oily liquid obtained by distilling coal tar; used to impregnate wood (as a preservative) and to waterproof materials. Also called dead oil and pitch oil.

creosote

1. a colourless or pale yellow liquid mixture with a burning taste and penetrating odour distilled from wood tar, esp from beechwood, contains creosol and other phenols, and is used as an antiseptic
2. a thick dark liquid mixture prepared from coal tar, containing phenols: used as a preservative for wood
References in periodicals archive ?
Occupational exposures to coal tar creosote are usually associated with work in wood preservation/pressure treatment facilities, fence building, bridge construction, utility work (telephone poles), aluminum smelting, and creosote site remediation.
Coal tar creosote exposures are regulated with an Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 0.
In many occupational settings, workers are exposed to combinations of coal tar, coal tar pitch, and coal tar creosote, making it difficult to ascertain the mutagenic and carcinogenic risks associated with coal tar creosote exposure alone.
In cases for which substitutes for coal tar creosote is truly unfeasible, adoption of less permeable clothing may prevent such cases in the future.
Creosote content (C) (pcf) was also determined as follows:
where A is the creosote content (% of dry, extracted wood) and 32 is the assumed density of the wood.
As described in the procedure for residual creosote distribution, visually defect-free samples were obtained from lumber at several vertical and horizontal locations in the poles.
The significant interaction shows that at a given pole service duration and vertical location, the creosote content had specific patterns of changes with respect to horizontal location (Figs.
3] of creosote in PEC provided the same level of protection against termites as 200 kg/[m.
However, with the limited data available, results indicate that when impregnated in a eucalypt timber substrate and exposed in-ground to subterranean termites and fungal decay, PEC formulation will perform comparably to HTC on an equivalent creosote retention basis.
The trial indicates that PEC will perform as well as HTC on an equivalent creosote retention basis.
High temperature creosote for the preservation of timber.