crescendo

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crescendo

Music
a. a gradual increase in loudness or the musical direction or symbol indicating this
b. (as modifier): a crescendo passage
References in periodicals archive ?
Dresden were the devastating crescendi of this performance.
En la esfera orquestal, en la pequena ciudad de Mannheim, cercana a Heidelberg, Mozart quedo entusiasmado por el sonido de su orquesta en un momento en que hacia su ascension el principal genero de la musica pura, la sinfonia, con sus crescendi e diminuendi.
In music, this is not necessary since the sounds themselves move in time (the time of performance), unfold in melodies, increase and fade away in crescendi and decrescendi.
This can be noted in sonic or rhythmic components such as pitch portamenti, amplitude crescendi and decrescendi, frequency and amplitude vibrati, breathing, bowing or percussive accents, or even through multiple non-written stylistic inflections belonging to each performer and epoch.
Just as Camillo Sitte had said, 'the architect should compose the city like a Beethoven symphony; it should become a great, dramatic experience to walk through a sequence of urban spaces pulsating in scale on either side mixing new with old, monuments with parks, all unfolding on a series of axes and contained vistas into exploding crescendi'.
Under normal listening conditions this will be adequate, but this will not be enough power to reproduce demanding crescendi at live levels without also creating a good deal of distortion, and some constraint.
Play around with dynamics or the addition of crescendi and decrescendi in different places in the scale.
Three of Dvorak's Slavonic Dances were the hit of the night and the Tannhauser Overture possessed that essential tingle factor, superbly paced with crescendi of rich perfection.
These rich, lush textures distilling the lyrical with the angular were delivered with total empathy from the pianists, with some gut-wrenching crescendi, earth-shaking power and brooding tension.
Techniques included post-production doctoring of the ensemble balance and inserting artificial crescendi. Also important for the Stokowski sound was the use of multiple-point pickups during the recording process, where extra microphones were positioned to collect the reflected sound of the acoustical background.
Some of the effects are still vivid in my mind: the almost crushing walls of sound in the Elektra crescendi; the absolute clarity of the kaleidoscope of instrumental coloring in Salome; the phenomenal sound of the brass fanfares in Friedenstag; the playfulness of the strings in Schweigsame Frau; and the long, lilting horn solo at the start of the Midnight music in the closing scene of Capriccio.