crevasse

(redirected from crevasses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

crevasse

(krəvăs`), large crack in the upper surface of a glacierglacier,
moving mass of ice that survives year to year, formed by the compacting of snow into névé and then into granular ice and set in motion outward and downward by the force of gravity and the stress of its accumulated mass.
..... Click the link for more information.
, formed by tension acting upon the brittle ice. Transverse crevasses occur where the grade of the glacier bed becomes suddenly steeper; longitudinal crevasses, where the glacier spreads over a wider valley or plain. Marginal crevasses are due to the strain built up when the central part moves faster than the sides.

crevasse

[krə′vas]
(geology)
An open, nearly vertical fissure in a glacier or other mass of land ice or the earth, especially after earthquakes.

crevasse

1. a deep crack or fissure, esp in the ice of a glacier
2. US a break in a river embankment
References in periodicals archive ?
The team practices rope work, crevasse rescue, navigation, weather observations, and polar camping skills.
'The idea of falling into a crevasse was very real and scary as one cannot be sure of the chances of rescue and survival,' says Hetal.
A BRITISH climate scientist has been killed in Antarctica after his snowmobile plunged 100ft into a crevasse.
But it was still slow work, weaving our way through the crevasses --one of us with a painfully swollen foot--until we reached smoother ground, passing Worsley's 'great dome-shaped nunatak' and crossing to the Fortuna Glacier, where we camped for a second time.
I alighted from the chopper cautiously, mindful that the snow is several feet deep and that crevasses lie hidden all around us.
Earlier in the expedition, team doctor Meinir Jones, from Swansea, was left "shaken" after falling down a crevasse, while Peter has developed blisters on his stump, a major concern for the support team who are monitoring his progress in Wales.
The area is considered particularly dangerous due to its steep slope and deep crevasses that cut through the snow and ice covering the pass year round.
"With Google Maps, you can instantly transport yourself to the top of these peaks and enjoy the sights without all the avalanches, rock slides, crevasses, and dangers from altitude and weather that mountaineers face."
- Staff at Mount Rainier National Park are warning visitors to watch out for crevasses on the popular Muir snowfield.
The army said last week that clearance efforts were underway round the clock and efforts are being undertaken to tackle effects of water on the site in the shape of ponds, cutting and crevasses. The water has started draining and has resulted in quick reduction of water levels in the lake up to 27 feet.
crevasses, crags, and scarps; Undecorating pines and ledges with A