crevice corrosion


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crevice corrosion

[′krev·əs kə′rō·zhən]
(metallurgy)
Corrosive degradation of metal parts at the crevices left at rolled joints or from other forming procedures; common in stainless steel heat exchangers in contact with chloride-containing fluids or other dissolved corrosives. Also known as contact corrosion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Titanium is usually resistant to the general corrosion, pitting attack, and crevice corrosion that may occur in other metal implants as a result of attack from aggressive organic fluids.
Duplex stainless steel is extensively used in these industries because of its high resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking in chloride bearing environments, sulfide stress corrosion, very high mechanical strength, and high energy absorption, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and good workability and weldability.
The formation of such cells cause pronounced damage at cracks, crevices, hence the true crevice corrosion. In engineering studies crevices are quite common at the border of two pipes that are coupled together and at junctions made y threaded pieces.
The microstructure of the SS-sprayed coating (Figure 2(b)) could allow the deposition of aggressive ions, water, and moisture particles on valleys, which cause localized or crevice corrosion. The Ti-sprayed coating also exhibited fine cracking on the surface but had little influence on the deposition of water molecules.
Corrosion is then initiated through a process similar to classical crevice corrosion. The effect of different oxides on the corrosion of steel in concrete was examined by Avila-Mendoza et al.
With the build-up of road debris and poultice in this interface, conditions that support crevice corrosion can form, which can result in an acutely virulent corrosion attack [5, 6, 7].
Different types of corrosion, including crevice corrosion, intergranular corrosion, and pitting corrosion, can affect an implant.
Several coating systems were prepared to find a coating system that would indicate crevice corrosion, as can be expected to occur in a nut and bolt assembly designed to duplicate the use of bolts to hold a structure.
Much metal loss in oilfield casings is caused by crevice corrosion. Although corrosion will initially be uniform across the surface area of the metal, in time it will accelerate in any small crevice in the metal.