crib

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crib

1. a representation of the manger in which the infant Jesus was laid at birth
2. Informal chiefly Brit a translation of a foreign text or a list of answers used by students, often illicitly, as an aid in lessons, examinations, etc.
3. short for cribbage
4. Cribbage the discard pile
5. a storage area for floating logs contained by booms
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Crib

 

a structure in the form of a cage that is usually made of logs and beams and is filled with ballast (stones or, sometimes, dirt). A distinction is made between solid-construction cribs in the form of a shell (Russian design) and lattice-construction cribs (American design). Both types can be built of individual reinforced-concrete beams. The length of a crib may be as much as 60 m. Cribs are used as structural elements for the retaining walls, the piers and abutments of bridges, wooden dams, flood beds, aprons, sills, and cofferdams on solid and rocky foundations.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

crib

[krib]
(civil engineering)
The space between two successive ties along a railway track.
(engineering)
Any structure composed of a layer of timber or steel joists laid on the ground, or two layers across each other, to spread a load.
Any structure composed of frames of timber placed horizontally on top of each other to form a wall.
(geology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crib

1. A lining of a shaft, such as a framework of timbers.
2. A framework constructed of squared timbers, steel, or concrete members; used as a retaining wall or to provide support for construction above.
3. A partial enclosure for storing hay, corn, or the like; also see corncrib.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.