Crick

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Crick

Francis Harry Compton. 1916--2004, English molecular biologist: helped to discover the helical structure of DNA; Nobel prize for physiology or medicine shared with James Watson and Maurice Wilkins 1962

jackscrew

A jack in which a screw is used for lifting; carries a plate which bears on the load.
References in periodicals archive ?
We needed to work closely with the Cricks scientists, the designers and the contractor to make sure that the multi-purpose needs of the building were met.
On Wednesday 9th November The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh, accompanied by the Duke of York, formally opened the Francis Crick Institute.
The Francis Crick Institute is the first laboratory, and one of the first buildings of any type, to be subject to the latest UK energy regulations.
His answer, finally, comes from his family's penchant for narration--"Or, like the Cricks who out of their watery toils could always dredge up a tale or two, you can tell stories" (61).
Precisely because he has been so successful in immersing himself in the histories of the French Revolution, of the Atkinsons and Cricks, and in natural history has he been able to avoid telling the stories of the abortion and suicide until now, when the combined pressures of his wife's insanity and baby-snatching and the loss of his job force him finally to confront the past.
2) Furthermore, the criticism that has accrued around the natural, topographical, imperial, and family histories Crick relates actually occludes the narrative project of the novel.
The pressure of these two current events is unbearable, and Crick cannot now cope with the present, thus he starts his journey back into his memory as he undergoes a process termed "re-remembering," which itself stems from our instinctive needs both to tell stories and to confess crimes and misdeeds.
Tom Crick's student Price triggers this process because he symbolizes Crick's bodily theory of history and represents the aborted son Crick never knew.
Indeed, Cricks reputation as an atheist and Humanist created controversy but he acknowledged that his rejection of a religious worldview helped form his reasons for investigating questions about life and consciousness.
In 1953 Francis Crick and James Dewey Watson discovered the double-helix structure of deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA.
Crick publicly supported Humanism as a notable signatory of the American Humanist Association's Humanist Manifesto III in 2003 as well as its predecessor, Humanist Manifesto II in 1973.