crisis

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crisis

Pathol a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a disease

Crisis

 

a sharp turning point in the course of a disease that is accompanied by a drop in elevated body temperature and improvement in the patient’s condition.

A crisis usually occurs in acute-onset diseases with a rapid rise in temperature (croupous inflammation of the lungs, malaria, relapsing fever, and so forth). A crisis is associated with profuse sweating, marked weakness, and sometimes a temporary slowing of cardiac activity. A crisis is the opposite of a gradual subsidence of a pathological process and lowering in temperature called lysis. A crisis is to be distinguished from a pseudocrisis, in which there is only a temporary lowering of temperature and improvement in the patient’s condition. A critical drop in temperature may also occur as a result of removal of the suppurative focus from the patient’s body or administration of powerful antimicrobial agents.

crisis

[′krī·səs]
(medicine)
The turning point in the course of a disease.
(psychology)
The psychological events associated with a specific stage of life, as an identity crisis or developmental crisis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crises and disasters harm communities, the achievements of peoples and nations and their institutions.
Risks that are not managed well or risks that become inflated, can evolve into crises.
Decreased likelihood that small crises will become severe
Given that most participants reported responding to high-risk crises during their master's-level field experiences (e.
Review organizational crises of the past three months and identify key lessons learned.
At the same time, author does not give any suggestion what could be the optimal solution in case of similar crises in other organisations of the same type.
Third, all crises will affect other areas of functioning, including home, work and school.
SCCT argues that information about past crises is a significant factor that can affect perceptions of a more recent crisis.
Our study occurred during international crises that were immediately described by media and politicians as "terrorism".
Judaism survived its recurrent crises not by surrendering to new gods (idolatry), nor by incorporating the less demanding elements of new theologies (syncretism); rather Israel survived by being called back by her prophets (often in strident terms) to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.
Today, he notes, more and more managers realize that they need to provide at the very least "emotional first aid" during crises.