critical humidity

critical humidity

[′krid·ə·kəl yü′mid·əd·ē]
(chemical engineering)
The humidity of a system's atmosphere above which a crystal of a water-soluble salt will always become damp (absorb moisture from the atmosphere) and below which it will always stay dry (release moisture to the atmosphere).
(metallurgy)
The atmospheric humidity above which the corrosion rate increases rapidly for a particular metal.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, the water vapor density was kept below this critical humidity during testing.
By comparing Figures 5 and 6, one can see that critical humidity ratio values (i.e.
Critical humidity ratio lines are illustrated in Figure 8(a) for a RAMEE system with a [MgCl.sub.2] solution as operating liquid desiccant during summer operating conditions.
The critical humidity ratio of [MgCl.sub.2] solution varies from 7.7 g/kg (0.0077 lb/lb) at 40[degrees]C (104[degrees]F - 22% RH) to 3.3 g/kg (0.0033 lb/lb) at 25[degrees]C (77[degrees]F - 17% RH) for the 50% indoor relative humidity operating condition.
Figure 8(b) shows the critical humidity ratio lines of a RAMEE system with [MgCl.sub.2] solution as the coupling fluid during winter operating conditions.
Critical humidity ratio lines for the LiCl-Water solution are shown in Figure 9 for summer operating conditions.
A certain number of layers sufficient to start corrosion processes will be formed at a critical humidity level of about 60-70% RH at room temperature, depending on the substrate polarity and its surface energy.
In addition to a critical humidity film, a metallization with sensitivity to migration behavior is required.
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