crook


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crook

Music a piece of tubing added to a brass instrument in order to obtain a lower harmonic series

crook

1. The warp of a board edge from a straight line drawn between the two ends; also called edgebend or spring.
2. A piece of timber so warped; a knee.
References in classic literature ?
"Uncle is too absurd," cried Ruby to Crook, round whose shoulders she had seriously placed a string of sausages.
"He is harlequin to your columbine," said Crook. "I am only the clown who makes the old jokes."
The pantomime was utterly chaotic, yet not contemptible; there ran through it a rage of improvisation which came chiefly from Crook the clown.
Scannell beat Redcar's Kevin Harvey on Crook Town ABC's bill.
Matthew Crook, who represented England playing football at junior level, was on his way home from a meal with his girlfriend at a pub in Northumberland when tragedy struck.
Eighty seven years ago, Darn Crook was busy with traders' traffic.
Staffordshire Police have revealed how David Crook, now 68, met the girl, who was then 15, and offered her a place to sleep following a party on Bonfire Night in 1983.
George Crook's military career was closely linked with the settlement of the West and the forced relocation of the Indian tribes.
However, the coroner ruled that he could not be certain that Nick Crook, 47, intended to commit suicide.
One of Barber's pensioner victims, Eileen Dunn, 71, from Wallasey, previously said: "If it looks like a crook and sounds like a crook, then it is a crook.
Timothy Crook, 51, lashed out at both his father Robert Crook, 83, and mother Elsie Crook, 76, in the bedroom of their Wiltshire home during a sustained and deadly attack.
Crook eventually parked his truck at the back of the property and fled on foot, police said, jumping into the Coast Fork of the Willamette River on the western boundary of the victim's property.