crook

(redirected from crooks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

crook

Music a piece of tubing added to a brass instrument in order to obtain a lower harmonic series
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

crook

1. The warp of a board edge from a straight line drawn between the two ends; also called edgebend or spring.
2. A piece of timber so warped; a knee.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"I took you for some darned crook, but now I remember you perfectly.
"To think that I've only to invent a trap to catch a crook, for a blamed crook to walk right into!
"It looks to me," said he, "as though the crook had rung up somebody before he went off."
"But I don't see what that's got to do with the crook," pursued the secretary, with his relentless eyes boring deeper and deeper into mine.
John Crook, journalist, had heard of that eminent City magnate; and it was not his fault if the City magnate had not heard of him; for in certain articles in The Clarion or The New Age Sir Leopold had been dealt with austerely.
In front of the large hall fire, over which hung the colonel's sword, the process was completed and the company, including the saturnine Crook, presented to Sir Leopold Fischer.
"A radical does not mean a man who lives on radishes," remarked Crook, with some impatience; and a Conservative does not mean a man who preserves jam.
Crook looked at him with an eye of interest and even respect.
"Well, well," observed Crook, airily, "don't let's quarrel.
"I'm all for making a policeman into sausages," said John Crook. "It's a better definition of Socialism than some recently given.
"That's true," admitted Crook, nodding eagerly and walking about.
Crook shall be clown; he's a journalist and knows all the oldest jokes.