cross-check

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cross-check

i. A call made by one crewmember or a controller to another crewmember to recheck or confirm a certain state or condition.
ii. The act of checking independent flight instruments for agreement or discrepancy, to confirm indications, or to detect the failure of one or more instruments.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Participation in industry or customer cross-checks Performance rating Actions taken to improve cross-check performance
PHOTO : Figure 5 - repeatability (r) in three cross-checks
PHOTO : Figure 6 - between-laboratory reproducibility (R) in three cross-checks
* 3rd Mooney cross-check by the IISRP-ES-TC, 1986 (International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers - European Section - Technical Committee) with 11 participants from Europe.
Because all of the squ ares covered by the left part have trivial cross-check sets, we need not consider those squares when traversing the dawg--we need only to know the maximum size of the left part.
(A simple LegalMove procedure might simply keep track of the highest-scoring move, and discard the rest.) We can express the backtracking search as a recursive procedure ExtendRight: ExtendRight (PartialWord, node N in dawg, square) = if square is vacant then If N is a terminal node then LegalMove (PartialWord) for each edge E out of N if the letter l labeling edge E is in our rack and l is in the cross-check set of square then remove a tile l from the rack let N' be the node reached by following edge E let next-square be the square to the right of square ExtendRight (PartialWord .
Because there are only 26 letters in the alphabet, we can conveniently store each cross-check set as a bit-vector in one 32-bit machine word, and do membership testing quickly.
As you near the MDA and the runway, cross-check the VDP and the GPS distance to the runway as an early indicator that you may have to go missed.
If you are flying at 90 knots that means that you'll have a cross-check every 40 seconds, leaving about 35 seconds to make a control adjustment and for the results to show.
Rounding to 310 would make the numbers easier to cross-check during the approach.
In this example, the 15-second time to impact, divided by two or three results in a proper cross-check time of about 5 to 7 seconds.
When the yielding fighter re-enters, and the hazard increases, both pilots should have visual contact and should increase the frequency of the cross-check in proportion to the potential time to impact.