cross-control stall

cross-control stall

A stall entered with crossed controls (i.e., aileron pressure applied in one direction and rudder pressure in the opposite direction). The usual result is spin entry.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect is to increase the airplane's tendency to roll off abruptly in a cross-control stall. A cross-control stall in those airplanes can mean a loss of several hundred feet even if the recovery is done precisely right.
In addition, when excessive back-elevator pressure is applied, a cross-control stall may result.
But so long as you keep the load factor low, you have a buffer over a cross-control stall. Tip: Lift the nose a bit as you roll in and apply that top rudder early.
We consider ease of coordination a safety factor when maneuvering at low speed as an inadvertent stall is bad enough--a cross-control stall almost guarantees a significant wing drop and incipient spin, dramatically increasing the altitude required for a recovery.
But a cross-control stall can result if the combination of low altitude and poor training tricks a pilot into holding a constant bank angle while trying to increase the turn rate with additional rudder input.
The Airplane Flying Handbook again: "In a cross-control stall, the airplane often stalls with little warning.
Unchecked, a cross-control stall is an easy way to put the airplane into a spin.
So can a skidded turn on to final approach with a cross-control stall as the final event in that fatal-accident scenario.
A cross-control stall occurs when--as its name implies--ailerons are deflected in one direction and rudder is in the other.
But--and as the accident record demonstrates--other types of stalls exist, including accelerated and cross-control stalls. Detailed examinations of these two variants are somewhat beyond this article's scope, however.
When maneuvering at low altitude, a cross-control stall in one of these airplanes can be a killer, so much so that it long ago earned the title of "moose stall" (in honor of all of the late Alaskan pilots who hit the ground after a cross-control stall when flying at low altitude to eyeball wildlife).
As long as you keep those cross-control stalls in the front of your mind, the Champ loves to slip and landing is fairly simple.