cross-country flying


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cross-country flying

Flying an airplane from one geographical location to another, especially over long distances great enough from the point of origin to require some form of navigation.
References in periodicals archive ?
John had many interests over the years which included flying (where he got as far as solo cross-country flying), motorcycling (sadly having to part with his Indian due to a growing family), hunting and marksmanship (winning 2nd place in the 1951 Douglas Police Pistol Matches).
After the 15 hours, students start to learn everything included in cross-country flying, so that they can communicate with the air-traffic controller, and be able to fly on their own.
The test was the culmination of months of hard work - including seven written theory exams, at least 45 hours' ' flying training, including 10 hours' ' solo flying, five hours' ' solo cross-country flying and at least one solo flight of not fewer than 150 nautical miles with full-stop landings at two or more different aerodromes.
Courses include "Take-Offs and Landings Made Easy," "VFR Cross-Country Flying," "Communications," "Surviving Your Most Feared Emergencies," "Night Flying" and many others.
Starting with a private pilot license (PPL), students first complete 46 hours of ground training and stage examination before undergoing 40 hours of flying with four hours of basic instrument work, three hours of night and ten hours of cross-country flying.
Cross-country flying is nearly a warfare-mission area, all onto its own, and should be treated as such.
'These competitions are all about cross-country flying - endurance, distance and speed all in one.
This is true of any cross-country flying. Weather is the biggest variable in flight planning and takes up most of the planning stage and all of the actual flying.
Cruise speeds are claimed as 110 knots at 75 percent power and that's about what we recorded, more or less, making the airplane suitable for modest cross-country flying.
In reality, any cross-country flying demands a level of preparation consistent with the trip ahead.
Many pilots have found there's a "sweet spot" for cross-country flying, above the general crowd but below the realm of turbine airplanes, where traffic is scarce but the advantages are many.
I am puzzled by your assertion in "If I Had A Hammer" (August 2006) that "a lower-powered airplane isn't a good choice for serious cross-country flying."