cross-cultural comparison

cross-cultural comparison

the comparison of a social phenomenon in different societies, and perhaps at different historical times, with the aim of establishing either:
  1. the common ‘causal’ basis of shared features, including the existence of any orderly pattern to social evolution; or
  2. the unique features of a particular culture or society. Sociologists have often held sharply contrasting views on the relative importance of these two goals of cross-cultural analysis. Most theorists have recognized the considerable difficulty of defining the units of analysis and of comparing like with like in cross-cultural comparisons. While theorists and researchers taking the first view have been prepared to risk advancing general propositions about the overall form and types of human societies, those taking the second view have used comparisons mainly to highlight differences, usually portraying their use of general concepts merely as aids to comparisons (i.e. as heuristic IDEAL TYPES), with their main goal the understanding of particular cultures. See also COMPARATIVE METHOD.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The team designed a cross-cultural comparison, examining data from two large representative studies of adults: Midlife in the United States and Midlife in Japan, both funded by the National Institute on Aging.
An exploratory study of social support: A cross-cultural comparison of Chinese-, Japanese-, and Anglo-American breast cancer patients.
Though she recorded another forty narratives in Israel, she decided not to include these, which is understandable, but would have added fascinating cross-cultural comparison.
From a methodological point of view, the use of individual measures of cultural orientation instead of simple country proxy indicators in explaining the effect of cultural orientations on media product selection distinguishes this study from similar cross-cultural comparison studies.
An educator looking for more information on comparison of contemporary socioeconomic conditions and cross-cultural comparison of fatherhood with relation to social policy will find this text as a valuable start, especially if looking to conduct future research.
He proposed that a cross-cultural comparison of all human societies would reveal that distinct worldviews consisted of the same basic elements.
For one thing, this reader was left pondering what Geschiere's cross-cultural comparison would have looked like had it considered medico-anthropological accounts of how healers and their patients talk about witchcraft, and how, in the intimacy of the home, these accounts give rise to the figure of the witch and to the development of protective medicine to counter black magic.
An earlier study (Okleshen and Hoyt, 1996) conducted a cross-cultural comparison of ethical perspectives and decision approaches of business students in the USA and New Zealand.
The measurement of handedness: A cross-cultural comparison of samples from England and Papua New Guinea.
Gonzales (1982) in a cross-cultural comparison of five ethnic groups used the HFD as a measure of intellectual development using the Koppitz method of scoring.
This study explores teachers' academic expectations of students from low socioeconomic status (SES) in Costa Rica for the purpose of cross-cultural comparison.
A cross-cultural comparison of perceptions and uses of mobile telephony.