cross-fertilization


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cross-fertilization:

see fertilizationfertilization,
in biology, process in the reproduction of both plants and animals, involving the union of two unlike sex cells (gametes), the sperm and the ovum, followed by the joining of their nuclei.
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cross-fertilization

[′krȯs ‚fərd·əl·ə′zā·shən]
(botany)
Fertilization between two separate plants.
(zoology)
Fertilization between different kinds of individuals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Early development from fertilized egg to early gastrula of this cross-fertilization was quite similar to that of the conspecific A.
The issue of the degree of pollen dispersal and cross-fertilization between maize genotypes has become increasingly important with the recent and continued release of new transgenic maize hybrids.
Chances are the floodgates will open, allowing cross-fertilization and professional development to flourish.
Areas of cross-fertilization are expected in new techniques that can be applied, but principles from mainstream surface-mount technology can also be adopted.
At its core, the book describes the cross-fertilization of terrorism and international organized crime.
Caux offered them a chance for cross-fertilization with other groups involved in training people for responsibility and leadership.
And although--as with any change--it can have downsides, this cross-fertilization is overwhelmingly a force for good.
It also elaborates on four key elements of Operation Cooperation (networking, partnering for problem solving, cross-fertilization, and information sharing) and presents examples of partnerships in several states.
The W100 will serve as the female and the gps mutant will serve as the males for cross-fertilization.
The UK College of Dentistry, with the UK Chandler Medical Center, established the Center for Oral Health Research (COHR) to enhance multidisciplinary research and nurture cross-fertilization of research expertise.
The second part of the book, entitled "Individual Trajectories and Spaces of Norms: Cross-fertilization and Cosmopolitanism," focusses on a "sociology of coming and going, of entering and leaving, of cross-fertilization" that examines new identities that emerge more out of movement than out of settlement.
By putting multiple companies under one banner, Mosaic hopes to create cross-fertilization for its clients.