cross-lamination

cross-lamination

[¦krȯs lam·ə′nā·shən]
(geology)
(materials)
Construction of a laminated composite material so that some layers are oriented at right angles to the other layers with respect to the grain or the strongest direction in terms of tension.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ripple cross-lamination and Planar horizontal lamination sandstone facies represent deposition in lower velocities regime at shallower depth.
Lithofacies number and lithofacies Lithofacies Association Lithofacies number Description D 8 Conglomeratic Sandstones with through-cross stratification 9 Sandstones with planar high angle cross-stratification 10 Sandstone with planar stratification, rich in organics 11 Sandstone with climbing ripple cross-lamination C 6, 12 Laminated and massive claystones with Sandy lenses, Massive sandstones.
Spectacular cross-lamination is displayed in many coastal exposures, notably in Point Pleasant Park at the south end of Halifax Peninsula (Fig.
Cross-lamination is common in cross-section views and typically shows a strong component of paleoflow to the NW.
Current-generated cross-lamination is again common (Figs.
10) of shales and sandstones with different types of cross-stratification and cross-lamination (hydraulic dunes and ripples respectively).
The shales are interfingered with thin sandstone levels with different types of cross-lamination. They are mainly composed of clays and siliceous silts and display variable amounts of water-reworked ash deposits.
Several conglomeratic horizons display small scale cross-laminations. Some levels of conglomeratic sandstones present thin coarsening upward sequences locally (Fig.
The unit can contain layers of bioclastic packstone limestones showing a sharp erosional base, internal hummocky cross-lamination and bioclastic rills (Figs.
The upper part of the sequence is constituted by intraclastic packstone to grainstone limestones showing internal hummocky cross-lamination. Geometries are tabular to lenticular and the base is frequently marked by an erosive surface.
TD-striped film can be laminated to the original MD striped film to make film with higher yield strength (up to 150 MPa, or 21,750 psi), plus greater tear resistance and impact strength than previous cross-laminations.