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crosslink

[′krȯs ‚liŋk]
(cell and molecular biology)
A covalent linkage between the complementary strands of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) duplex or between bases of a single strand of DNA.
(organic chemistry)
The covalent bonds between adjacent polymer chains that lock the chains in place.
References in periodicals archive ?
We first prepare interstrand cross-links that mimic what lesion the drug would introduce in the cell between two single strands of DNA via organic synthesis.
Improvement is also attributable to the fact that with the capture-probe/flanking-probe approach, the capture probe needs to cross-link to only one of the two flanking probes for target capture to occur.
Values in the risedronate group after 5 years of treatment were also virtually unchanged from baseline: The mean crystallinity ratio was 0.93, and the cross-link ratio was 1.64.
"Sabic's new resins are specifically designed and beneficial for cross-linked foaming processes.
Preparation of Cross-Linked Chitosan/Poly(ethylene oxide) Fibers.
Native pericardium treated with GA showed less amount of low molecular weight proteins, which indicated that GA had the greatest ability to cross-link the biomaterials.
Gelatin that was not successfully cross-linked after UV exposure solubilized in the distilled and deionized water.
It acts as both a photo-sensitizer for the induction of cross-links between collagen fibrils, as well as shielding the underlying tissue from the effects of UVA (Figure 3).
(23) 20 96 Current study 53 26 XLPE, highly cross-linked polyethylene; MoM, metal-on-metal; CoC, ceramic-on-ceramic X3 [R], new generation ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene.
This paper describes the behaviour of a halogen-free granulate compared to produced cross-linked cable sheath.
(ASTI) along with engineers of Diedrichs & Associates, Inc., Cedar Falls, Iowa, designed a unique machine to inject a liquid cross-linked polymer solution into established turf such as golf courses, sports fields, or landscaped areas.

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