cross-reaction

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Related to cross-react: cross-reactivity

cross-reaction

[′krȯs rē′ak·shən]
(immunology)
Reaction between an antibody and a closely related, but not complementary, antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AAV) including MPA may have antibodies which cross-react with pathogen antigens, and may be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.
Previous experiments used HPLC to fractionate serum and identify a peak that cross-reacts with many PTH immunoassays.
Major outer membrane proteins from many Campylobacter species cross-react with cholera toxin.
The classification was supported if the isolate did not cross-react with species-specific primers for GBS in polymerase chain reaction analysis, and if the API 20 Strep test indicated the presence of Streptococcus porcinus, a swine pathogen with 94% gene sequence similarity.
Balsam of Peru can cross-react with various foods as well as with other substances--for example, turpentine.
Bovine-derived thrombin has been associated with the development of antibodies that may cross-react with human blood proteins and in some cases these antibodies appear to be related to serious bleeding complications.
These reports suggest the possibility that pectic polysaccharide-reacting natural antibodies may be produced originally to act against autoantigens of human and rodents, and that these autoantibodies may cross-react with oligosaccharide moieties in pharmacologically active pectic polysaccharides from the medicinal herbs.
Drug toxicology screens do not specifically test for dextromethorphan, but the drug can cross-react with the test for phencyclidine (PCP).
Research is underway to assure no other bacteria cross-react with the magnetic beads.
Advise patients to carry auto-injectable epinephrine and to avoid foods that cross-react with latex, such as bananas, kiwis, and avocados.
Concerns that the antibody response to beta-hCG may have the potential to cross-react with and interrupt other hormones produced in the pituitary gland have slowed the progress of anti-hCG clinical research.
Investigations are under way to make sure that no other bacteria cross-react with the magnetic beads.