cross-sectional study


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Related to cross-sectional study: Case Control Study, Cohort study, PubMed

cross-sectional study

[¦krȯs ¦sek·shən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of groups of individuals differing on the basis of specified criteria (for example, age) at the same point in time.

cross-sectional study

a method of examining a varied population at one point in time in order to gather data about people at different life stages, or in different circumstances. This method contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which investigate groups over a time period, in order to observe the developmental process, the influence of changing circumstances. The advantage of cross-sectional study is that it is quicker, not dependent on changing resources or research teams, and reduces extraneous variables resulting from the passage of time. The disadvantage is that no account of change can be given.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a cross-sectional study undertaken between 2008-2009, in 1785 individuals the prevalence of DPN was found to be 63.
Cross-sectional study of oral mucosal conditions among a central Amazonian Indian community, Brazil.
Prevalence and patterns of multimorbidity among elderly people in rural Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study.
Data Source: A cross-sectional study among 36,284 adolescents aged 12-17 years from the National Survey of Children's Health.
In the 2004 MMWR report, the first sentence of the Editorial Note referred to a cross-sectional study of homes with very high lead levels in drinking water and stated that "no children were identified with blood lead [greater than or equal to] 10 [micro]g/dL, even in homes with the highest water lead levels.
1) In an international cross-sectional study of individuals with genital herpes who were in monogamous, heterosexual relationships, only about half knew that the infection could be transmitted between outbreaks.
A cross-sectional study of children in West Kalimantan, Indonesia, was conducted to examine the relationship between malnutrition history, child IQ, school attendance, socioeconomic status, parental education and parental IQ.
6) Jeffrey Johnson and Ellen Hall, "Job Strain, Workplace Social Support, and Cardiovascular Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study of a Random Sample of the Swedish Working Population," American Journal of Public Health 78, no.
Cross-sectional study results may not be as useful as those techniques that utilize panel data.
This cross-sectional study considered what differences are evident in the oral fairy tales that children tell at different ages.
369, 2000), are based on a cross-sectional study that looked at 114 HIV-infected individuals who did not have AIDS-related pulmonary complications.
Thus, for example, although in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study, a progressive linear decline in creatinine clearance was noted by cross-sectional study, longitudinal evaluation allowed the establishment of the actual rate of renal ageing, in which an acceleration of the rate of decline with advancing age occurs [7].