cross-tolerance


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cross-tolerance

[¦krȯs ′täl·ə·rəns]
(medicine)
Tolerance or resistance to the action of a drug brought about by continued use of another drug of similar pharmacologic action.
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Cross-tolerance associated with temperature and salinity stress during germination of barley seeds.
Response to temperature stress of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes in cross-tolerance of barley seed germination.
Framework of Addiction Interaction Disorders (1) Cross-tolerance (a) "A simultaneous increase of addictive behaviour in two or more addictions", or (b) when one addictive behaviour is substituted for another and there is a higher-than-expected tolerance for the new behaviour.
This illustrates that, under the range of operating conditions used in this study, cross-tolerance is insignificant in predicting viability loss.
As mentioned earlier, acclimation to some stresses has also been found to provide cross-tolerance to other stresses.
This drug-induced biotransformation of itself and other drugs is another source of tolerance and cross-tolerance.
Another mechanism that may contribute to alcohol-nicotine interactions is cross-tolerance to the effects of both drugs.
The role of calcium and activated oxygen as signals for controlling cross-tolerance.
These mechanisms include genes that are involved in regulating certain brain chemical systems; neurobiological mechanisms, such as cross-tolerance and cross-sensitization to both drugs; conditioning mechanisms, in which cravings for alcohol or nicotine are elicited by certain environmental cues; and psychosocial factors (e.
Different opioids bind slightly differently to receptors, and incomplete cross-tolerance is common, she noted.
If confirmed in humans, this phenomenon, which is called cross-tolerance, may have important implications for the combined use of nicotine and alcohol in humans.