cross-bench

(redirected from crossbencher)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

cross-bench

Brit a seat in Parliament occupied by a neutral or independent member
References in periodicals archive ?
Labour joined Liberal Democrats and leading independent crossbenchers in the Lords to try to thwart such a "constitutional outrage" by amending Northern Ireland legislation.
Sarah Hogg is a member of the House of Lords where she sits as a Crossbencher. Amelia Fletcher and Richard Lloyd have not engaged in any political activity in the past five years
Lord Newby asked if ministers agreed with the Institute for Government that "Andrew Tyrie cannot be an independent chair of the Competition and Markets Authority and take the Government whip", but should sit as an independent crossbencher instead.
Only one lower house crossbencher has not withdrawn their support.
As well as a crossbencher in the House of Lords he sits on the board of Aston Villa and is president of Worcestershire county cricket club.
It makes me glad that I am a crossbencher and that I can stand back and vote the way that I want.
Independent crossbencher Baroness Masham of Ilton asked at question time: "Are the aeroplanes coming from the countries where there are these mosquitoes being sprayed?" Health minister Lord Prior of Brampton told her: "That is something that is under consideration at the moment.
We look to hear from BAE on this matter." Former chief of the defence staff and crossbencher Lord Craig of Radley asked if the outcome was "entirely satisfactory" from the Government's point of view.
As Lord Elis-Thomas himself pointed out last week, there is no such thing in the Assembly as a crossbencher. To take a Cabinet job would be to sit as an independent.
Crossbencher Baroness Finlay of Llandaff, a former GP and president of the Royal Society of Medicine, said the Government's Health and Social Care Bill did not place enough emphasis on treating those with complex conditions.
However, on Wednesday night independent crossbencher Lord Best withdrew without a vote an amendment on the final point of dispute between the Houses - the so-called bedroom tax which penalises council tenants for under-occupancy.
Tabled by crossbencher Lord Best, it protects certain vulnerable groups including disabled people, war widows and those unable to work from the bedroom tax unless they turn down a suitable smaller flat.